Next Article in Journal
Vascular Development and Regeneration in the Mammalian Heart
Next Article in Special Issue
Part and Parcel of the Cardiac Autonomic Nerve System: Unravelling Its Cellular Building Blocks during Development
Previous Article in Journal
A Matter of the Heart: The African Clawed Frog Xenopus as a Model for Studying Vertebrate Cardiogenesis and Congenital Heart Defects
Previous Article in Special Issue
Of Tracts, Rings, Nodes, Cusps, Sinuses, and Arrhythmias—A Comment on Szili-Torok et al.’s Paper Entitled “The ‘Dead-End Tract’ and Its Role in Arrhythmogenesis”. J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3, 11
Article Menu

Article Versions

Export Article

Open AccessReview
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3(2), 22; doi:10.3390/jcdd3020022

The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and Their Function in Striated Muscle

1
Developmental Dynamics, Harefield Heart Science Centre, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hill End Road, Harefield UB9 6JH, UK
2
Department of Medical Sciences, Medical Genetics Unit, University of Ferrara, Ferrara 44121, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Robert E. Poelmann and Monique R.M. Jongbloed
Received: 26 April 2016 / Revised: 31 May 2016 / Accepted: 13 June 2016 / Published: 15 June 2016
Download PDF [3623 KB, uploaded 15 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here, we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the number of POPDC-interacting proteins has been rising and currently includes ion channels (TREK-1), sarcolemma-associated proteins serving functions in mechanical stability (dystrophin), compartmentalization (caveolin 3), scaffolding (ZO-1), trafficking (NDRG4, VAMP2/3) and repair (dysferlin) or acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho-family GTPases (GEFT). Recent evidence suggests that POPDC proteins might also control the cellular level of the nuclear proto-oncoprotein c-Myc. These data suggest that this family of cAMP-binding proteins probably serves multiple roles in striated muscle.
Keywords: atrioventricular block; cyclic AMP; cardiac arrhythmia; membrane trafficking; membrane protein; limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; sinus bradycardia atrioventricular block; cyclic AMP; cardiac arrhythmia; membrane trafficking; membrane protein; limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; sinus bradycardia
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schindler, R.F.R.; Scotton, C.; French, V.; Ferlini, A.; Brand, T. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and Their Function in Striated Muscle. J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3, 22.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. EISSN 2308-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top