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Foods 2017, 6(7), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6070048

Glucose Content and In Vitro Bioaccessibility in Sweet Potato and Winter Squash Varieties during Storage

1
Poscosecha de Frutas y Hortalizas, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de la República, Av. Eugenio Garzón 780, CP12900 Montevideo, Uruguay
2
Nutrición y Calidad de Alimentos, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de la República, Av. Eugenio Garzón 780, CP12900 Montevideo, Uruguay
3
Fisiología y Nutrición, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, Iguá 2245, CP11400 Montevideo, Uruguay
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Theo H. Varzakas
Received: 30 May 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Analysis of Food Products)
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Abstract

Glucose content and in vitro bioaccessibility were determined in raw and cooked pulp of Arapey, Cuabé, and Beauregard sweet potato varieties, as well as Maravilla del Mercado and Atlas winter squash, after zero, two, four, and six months of storage (14 °C, 80% relative humidity (RH)). The total glucose content in 100 g of raw pulp was, for Arapey, 17.7 g; Beauregard, 13.2 g; Cuabé, 12.6 g; Atlas, 4.0 g; and in Maravilla del Mercado, 4.1 g. These contents were reduced by cooking process and storage time, 1.1 to 1.5 times, respectively, depending on the sweet potato variety. In winter squash varieties, the total glucose content was not modified by cooking, while the storage increased glucose content 2.8 times in the second month. After in vitro digestion, the glucose content released was 7.0 times higher in sweet potato (6.4 g) than in winter squash (0.91 g) varieties. Glucose released by in vitro digestion for sweet potato stored for six months did not change, but in winter squashes, stored Atlas released glucose content increased 1.6 times. In conclusion, in sweet potato and winter squash, the glucose content and the released glucose during digestive simulation depends on the variety and the storage time. These factors strongly affect the supply of glucose for human nutrition and should be taken into account for adjusting a diet according to consumer needs. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; bioaccessibility; Ipomoea batatas; Cucurbita sp.; postharvest glucose; bioaccessibility; Ipomoea batatas; Cucurbita sp.; postharvest
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Zaccari, F.; Cabrera, M.C.; Saadoun, A. Glucose Content and In Vitro Bioaccessibility in Sweet Potato and Winter Squash Varieties during Storage. Foods 2017, 6, 48.

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