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Foods 2017, 6(11), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6110100

Old Fashioned vs. Ultra-Processed-Based Current Diets: Possible Implication in the Increased Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in Childhood

Departamento de Nutrición y Metabolismo, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Carretera a La Victoria, Km. 0.6, Hermosillo, Sonora 83304, Mexico
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Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 27 October 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
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Abstract

Ultra-processed foods are ready-to-heat and ready-to-eat products created to replace traditional homemade meals and dishes due to convenience and accessibility. Because of their low-fiber and high-fat and sugar composition, these foodstuffs could induce a negative impact on health. They are partially responsible for obesity and chronic non-transmissible diseases; additionally, they could impact in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. The rationale is that the nutritional composition of ultra-processed foodstuffs can induce gut dysbiosis, promoting a pro-inflammatory response and consequently, a “leaky gut”. These factors have been associated with increased risk of autoimmunity in genetically predisposed children. In addition, food emulsifiers, commonly used in ultra-processed products could modify the gut microbiota and intestinal permeability, which could increase the risk of autoimmunity. In contrast, unprocessed and minimally processed food-based diets have shown the capacity to promote gut microbiota eubiosis, anti-inflammatory response, and epithelial integrity, through bacterial butyrate production. Thus, to decrease the susceptibility to autoimmunity, genetically predisposed children should avoid ultra-processed food products and encourage the consumption of fresh and minimally processed foods. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultra-processed food products; autoimmunity risk; type 1 diabetes; celiac disease; microbiota ultra-processed food products; autoimmunity risk; type 1 diabetes; celiac disease; microbiota
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Aguayo-Patrón, S.V.; Calderón de la Barca, A.M. Old Fashioned vs. Ultra-Processed-Based Current Diets: Possible Implication in the Increased Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in Childhood. Foods 2017, 6, 100.

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