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Climate 2015, 3(1), 150-167; doi:10.3390/cli3010150

Changes in Average Annual Precipitation in Argentina’s Pampa Region and Their Possible Causes

1
Department Natural Resources and Environment, School of Agriculture, University of Buenos Aires, Avenida San Martín 4453-C1417DSE, Argentina
2
Institute of Sciences, National University of General Sarmiento, Juan Gutierrez 1150, Los Polvorines, Buenos Aires 1613, Argentina
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Monica Ionita-Scholz
Received: 9 October 2014 / Revised: 4 January 2015 / Accepted: 12 January 2015 / Published: 20 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changes in Precipitation and Impacts on Regional Water Resources)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1896 KB, uploaded 20 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

Changes in annual rainfall in five sub-regions of the Argentine Pampa Region (Rolling, Central, Mesopotamian, Flooding and Southern) were examined for the period 1941 to 2010 using data from representative locations in each sub-region. Dubious series were adjusted by means of a homogeneity test and changes in mean value were evaluated using a hydrometeorological time series segmentation method. In addition, an association was sought between shifts in mean annual rainfall and changes in large-scale atmospheric pressure systems, as measured by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). The results indicate that the Western Pampas (Central and Southern) are more vulnerable to abrupt changes in average annual rainfall than the Eastern Pampas (Mesopotamian, Rolling and Flooding). Their vulnerability is further increased by their having the lowest average rainfall. The AMO showed significant negative correlations with all sub-regions, while the PDO and SOI showed significant positive and negative correlations respectively with the Central, Flooding and Southern Pampa. The fact that the PDO and AMO are going through the phases of their cycles that tend to reduce rainfall in much of the Pampas helps explain the lower rainfall recorded in the Western Pampas sub-regions in recent years. This has had a significant impact on agriculture and the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: agro-climatology; variability; segmentation of hydrometeorological time series; teleconnections; climate indices agro-climatology; variability; segmentation of hydrometeorological time series; teleconnections; climate indices
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez, S.; Sierra, E.; Momo, F.; Massobrio, M. Changes in Average Annual Precipitation in Argentina’s Pampa Region and Their Possible Causes. Climate 2015, 3, 150-167.

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