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Climate, Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2013), Pages 1-27

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Climate—A New Open Access Journal Covering the Complex, Multi-Disciplinary Climate Research Challenge
Climate 2013, 1(1), 1-3; doi:10.3390/cli1010001
Received: 14 November 2012 / Accepted: 16 November 2012 / Published: 19 November 2012
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Abstract
Climate has changed over the Earth’s past, is changing continuously and will do so in the future due to external and internal drivers. Some external drivers, such as the astronomic constellation of the Earth-sun system and continental shifts, have led to slow changes
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Climate has changed over the Earth’s past, is changing continuously and will do so in the future due to external and internal drivers. Some external drivers, such as the astronomic constellation of the Earth-sun system and continental shifts, have led to slow changes over long time scales. While others, for instance volcanic eruptions, may lead to fast, quasi-abrupt changes with impacts on climate over a limited time. Internal drivers like albedo, or the greenhouse effect are parts and processes of the climate system itself that may again change the climate at comparatively shorter time scales than most external drivers. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle On the Present Halting of Global Warming
Climate 2013, 1(1), 4-11; doi:10.3390/cli1010004
Received: 28 January 2013 / Revised: 15 April 2013 / Accepted: 15 April 2013 / Published: 3 May 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (810 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The rise in global average temperature over the last century has halted since roughly the year 2000, despite the fact that the release of CO2 into the atmosphere is still increasing. It is suggested here that this interruption has been caused by
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The rise in global average temperature over the last century has halted since roughly the year 2000, despite the fact that the release of CO2 into the atmosphere is still increasing. It is suggested here that this interruption has been caused by the suspension of the near linear (+ 0.5 °C/100 years or 0.05 °C/10 years) temperature increase over the last two centuries, due to recovery from the Little Ice Age, by a superposed multi-decadal oscillation of a 0.2 °C amplitude and a 50~60 year period, which reached its positive peak in about the year 2000—a halting similar to those that occurred around 1880 and 1940. Because both the near linear change and the multi-decadal oscillation are likely to be natural changes (the recovery from the Little Ice Age (LIA) and an oscillation related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), respectively), they must be carefully subtracted from temperature data before estimating the effects of CO2. Full article
Open AccessArticle From Climate Advocacy to Public Engagement: An Exploration of the Roles of Environmental Non-Governmental Organisations
Climate 2013, 1(1), 12-27; doi:10.3390/cli1010012
Received: 11 April 2013 / Revised: 8 June 2013 / Accepted: 12 June 2013 / Published: 19 June 2013
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Abstract
The capacity of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to encourage public engagement with climate protection is analysed through a conceptual framework focused on six advocacy functions: issue framing, knowledge generation and dissemination, attribution of responsibility, lobbying, public mobilisation and agenda setting. This framework is used
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The capacity of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to encourage public engagement with climate protection is analysed through a conceptual framework focused on six advocacy functions: issue framing, knowledge generation and dissemination, attribution of responsibility, lobbying, public mobilisation and agenda setting. This framework is used to organise and interpret the results of a fieldwork study of environmental NGOs, conducted in France, Germany and the UK. Key findings include the importance of the cross-linkage of climate with other categories of issue, NGO stress on knowledge as a precursor to action, a ‘politics of accountability’ in which the attribution of responsibility paves the way for making political demands, a preference for multi-layered lobbying, where process can be as important as product, and the need to adjust NGO mobilisation and agenda setting strategies in the aftermath of the 2009 Copenhagen negotiations and the financial crisis. Full article

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