Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
From Goals to Action: The Efforts for Increasing Energy Efficiency and Integration of Renewable Sources in Eskilstuna, Sweden
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Analysis of Short Time Period of Operation of Horizontal Ground Heat Exchangers
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Resources 2015, 4(3), 524-547; doi:10.3390/resources4030524

Geothermal Energy Potential in Low Enthalpy Areas as a Future Energy Resource: Identifying Feasible Targets, Quebec, Canada, Study Case

1,†,* and 2,†
1
Northern Geothermal, 105 Carlson Close, Edmonton, AB T6R2J8, Canada
2
Laboratoire des technologies de l'energie, Hydro-Québec Research Institut, Shawinigan, QC G9N 5N7, Canada
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Witold-Roger Poganietz
Received: 27 April 2015 / Revised: 9 July 2015 / Accepted: 10 July 2015 / Published: 15 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Sources in Developing and Developed Regions)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5957 KB, uploaded 15 July 2015]   |  

Abstract

Heat flow of the sedimentary succession of the Eastern Canada Sedimentary Basins varies from 40 mW/m2 close to the exposed shield in the north to high 60–70 mW/m2 in the southwest–northeast St. Lawrence corridor. As high fluid flow rates are required for a successful geothermal application, the most important targets are deep existing permeable aquifers rather than hard rock, which would need to be fracked. Unfortunately, the ten most populated Québec urban centers are in the areas where the Grenville (Canadian Shield) is exposed or at shallow depths with sedimentary cover where temperatures are 30 °C or less. The city of Drummondville will be the exception, as the basement deepens sharply southwest, and higher temperatures reaching >120 °C are expected in the deep Cambrian sedimentary aquifers near a 4–5-km depth. Deep under the area where such sediments could be occurring under Appalachian nappes, temperatures significantly higher than 140 °C are predicted. In parts of the deep basin, temperatures as high as 80 °C–120 °C exist at depths of 3–4 km, mainly southeast of the major geological boundary: the Logan line. There is a large amount of heat resource at such depths to be considered in this area for district heating. View Full-Text
Keywords: geothermal energy; Québec geothermal; heat flow; enhanced geothermal system (EGS); thermal conductivity; geostatistics; exploration; renewable energy geothermal energy; Québec geothermal; heat flow; enhanced geothermal system (EGS); thermal conductivity; geostatistics; exploration; renewable energy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Majorowicz, J.; Minea, V. Geothermal Energy Potential in Low Enthalpy Areas as a Future Energy Resource: Identifying Feasible Targets, Quebec, Canada, Study Case. Resources 2015, 4, 524-547.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Resources EISSN 2079-9276 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top