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Biosensors 2013, 3(4), 385-399; doi:10.3390/bios3040385
Article

Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine

1,* , 2
, 1
 and 1
Received: 30 October 2013; in revised form: 29 November 2013 / Accepted: 4 December 2013 / Published: 10 December 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Environmental Studies)
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Abstract: To date, different kinds of biosensing elements have been used effectively for environmental monitoring. Microbial cells seem to be well-suited for this task: they are cheap, adaptable to variable field conditions and give a measurable response to a broad number of chemicals. Among different pollutants, heavy metals are still a major problem for the environment. A reasonable starting point for the selection of a biorecognition element to develop a biosensor for metals could be that of a microorganism that exhibits good mechanisms to cope with metals. Pseudomonads are characterized by the secretion of siderophores (e.g., pyoverdine), low-molecular weight compounds that chelate Fe3+ during iron starvation. Pyoverdine is easily detected by colorimetric assay, and it is suitable for simple online measurements. In this work, in order to evaluate pyoverdine as a biorecognition element for metal detection, the influence of metal ions (Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn2+), but also of temperature, pH and nutrients, on microbial growth and pyoverdine regulation has been studied in P. fluorescens. Each of these variables has been shown to influence the synthesis of siderophore: for instance, the lower the temperature, the higher the production of pyoverdine. Moreover, the concentration of pyoverdine produced in the presence of metals has been compared with the maximum allowable concentrations indicated in international regulations (e.g., 98/83/EC), and a correlation that could be useful to build a colorimetric biosensor has been observed.
Keywords: heavy metals; pyoverdine; environmental monitoring; minimum inhibitory concentration; optical detection heavy metals; pyoverdine; environmental monitoring; minimum inhibitory concentration; optical detection
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Chiadò, A.; Varani, L.; Bosco, F.; Marmo, L. Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine. Biosensors 2013, 3, 385-399.

AMA Style

Chiadò A, Varani L, Bosco F, Marmo L. Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine. Biosensors. 2013; 3(4):385-399.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chiadò, Alessandro; Varani, Luca; Bosco, Francesca; Marmo, Luca. 2013. "Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine." Biosensors 3, no. 4: 385-399.

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