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Religions 2017, 8(4), 60; doi:10.3390/rel8040060

‘Nicht jüdeln’: Jews and Habsburg Loyalty in Franz Theodor Csokor’s Dritter November 1918

History Department, College of Letters & Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
Academic Editors: Malachi Hacohen and Peter Iver Kaufman
Received: 17 February 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [219 KB, uploaded 6 April 2017]

Abstract

This article argues that Franz Theodor Csokor’s three-act drama, Dritter November 1918: Ende der Armee Österreich-Ungarns (Third of November 1918: End of the Army in Austria-Hungary) reveals how Jewish difference played an important—if often unrecognized—role in the shaping the terms of Austrian patriotism in the years leading up to 1938. Portrayals of Habsburg loyalty as “Jewish” or “not Jewish” helped articulate how nostalgia for Austria-Hungary would figure in a new sense of Austrianness, a project that took on even more urgency under the authoritarian censors of the Ständestaat. While the play’s portrayal of a Jewish doctor as level-headed, peace-loving, and caring countered some egregious antisemitic stereotypes about disloyal and sexually perverted Jews, it also suggested that Jews were overly rational, lacking in emotional depth, and, ultimately, unable to embody a new Catholic, spiritual, Austrian patriotic ideal. Considered in its broader political context, and along with Csokor’s earlier unpublished drama Gesetz, the play reveals how labelling Habsburg loyalty as Jewish helped to clarify and critique the nature of what it meant to be Austrian under an authoritarian regime that promoted a pro-Catholic, anti-Nazi vision of Austrian patriotism. It also offers a prime example of how even anti-antisemitic authors like Csokor perpetuated negative stereotypes about Jews, even as they aimed to present them in a more positive light. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ständestaat; Austrian Jews; Jewish difference; antisemitism; Austria-Hungary; Franz Theodor Csokor; Empire Ständestaat; Austrian Jews; Jewish difference; antisemitism; Austria-Hungary; Franz Theodor Csokor; Empire
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Silverman, L. ‘Nicht jüdeln’: Jews and Habsburg Loyalty in Franz Theodor Csokor’s Dritter November 1918. Religions 2017, 8, 60.

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