Next Article in Journal
Plant Nutrient Dynamics in Stressful Environments: Needs Interfere with Burdens
Next Article in Special Issue
Phytochemical Analysis and Antioxidant Properties in Colored Tiggiano Carrots
Previous Article in Journal
Can Parentage Analysis Facilitate Breeding Activities in Root and Tuber Crops?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Quality and Nutritional Evaluation of Regina Tomato, a Traditional Long-Storage Landrace of Puglia (Southern Italy)
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agriculture 2018, 8(7), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8070096

Cultivation of Potted Sea Fennel, an Emerging Mediterranean Halophyte, Using a Renewable Seaweed-Based Material as a Peat Substitute

1
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, CNR—National Research Council of Italy, Via G. Amendola, 122/O, 70126 Bari, Italy
2
Department of Soil, Plant and Food Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Via Amendola 165/A, 70126 Bari, Italy
3
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Via Amendola, 165/A, 70126 Bari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 22 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Vegetable Crops, A Living Heritage)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [255 KB, uploaded 27 June 2018]

Abstract

Sea fennel (Crithmum maritimum L.), an emerging halophyte species, represents a nutritious and refined food product. In this study, the effect on yield and quality of potted sea fennel grown on three posidonia (Podisonia oceanica (L.) Delile)-based composts (a municipal organic solid waste compost, a sewage sludge compost and a green compost) and a peat-based substrate was analyzed. Composts were used both pure and mixed with peat at a dose of 50% on a volume basis. We hypothesized that the halophytic nature of this plant might overcome the limitations of high-salinity compost-based growing media. The growth parameters, color traits and trace metals content (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) of the edible parts were compared. Independently of the substrates, the average total and edible yields were 51 and 30 g plant−1, respectively, while the average waste portion was about 41%. The use of posidonia-based compost did not affect the color traits of sea fennel plants as compared with samples grown on the commercial peat-based substrate. In general, potted sea fennel grown on both posidonia-based composts and commercial peat-based substrate appeared a good source of essential micronutrients. Only a weak reduction of Fe and Mn concentrations was observed in plants grown on posidonia-based composts, especially when used at the highest dose. Independently of the growing medium, the content of potentially hazardous trace elements (Cd and Pb) in the edible parts of sea fennel was always below the maximum admissible limits fixed by the European legislation. Results indicate that posidonia-based composts can be used as a sustainable peat substitute for the formulation of soilless mixtures to grow potted sea fennel plants, even up to a complete peat replacement. View Full-Text
Keywords: Crithmum maritimum L.; domestication; food safety; heavy metal; Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile; growing substrate Crithmum maritimum L.; domestication; food safety; heavy metal; Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile; growing substrate
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Montesano, F.F.; Gattullo, C.E.; Parente, A.; Terzano, R.; Renna, M. Cultivation of Potted Sea Fennel, an Emerging Mediterranean Halophyte, Using a Renewable Seaweed-Based Material as a Peat Substitute. Agriculture 2018, 8, 96.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agriculture EISSN 2077-0472 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top