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Changes in the Nitrogen Budget and Soil Nitrogen in a Field with Paddy–Upland Rotation with Different Histories of Manure Application
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Agriculture 2017, 7(6), 49; doi:10.3390/agriculture7060049

Net Greenhouse Gas Budget and Soil Carbon Storage in a Field with Paddy–Upland Rotation with Different History of Manure Application

1
Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, 241-438 Aza Kaidobata-Nishi, Shimoshinjo Nakano, Akita 010-0195, Japan
2
Akita Prefectural Agricultural Experiment Station, 34-1, Aza Genpachizawa, Yuwa Aikawa, Akita 010-1231, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ryusuke Hatano
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 8 June 2017 / Published: 10 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue C and N Cycling and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Agroecosystem)
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Abstract

Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were measured from paddy–upland rotation (three years for soybean and three years for rice) with different soil fertility due to preceding compost application for four years (i.e., 3 kg FW m−2 year−1 of immature or mature compost application plots and a control plot without compost). Net greenhouse gas (GHG) balance was evaluated by integrating CH4 and N2O emissions and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions calculated from a decline in soil carbon storage. N2O emissions from the soybean upland tended to be higher in the immature compost plot. CH4 emissions from the rice paddy increased every year and tended to be higher in the mature compost plot. Fifty-two to 68% of the increased soil carbon by preceding compost application was estimated to be lost during soybean cultivation. The major component of net GHG emission was CO2 (82–94%) and CH4 (72–84%) during the soybean and rice cultivations, respectively. Net GHG emissions during the soybean and rice cultivations were comparable. Consequently, the effects of compost application on the net GHG balance from the paddy–upland rotation should be carefully evaluated with regards to both advantages (initial input to the soil) and disadvantages (following increases in GHG). View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon dioxide; methane; nitrous oxide; paddy–upland rotation; preceding compost application; rice; soybean carbon dioxide; methane; nitrous oxide; paddy–upland rotation; preceding compost application; rice; soybean
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Takakai, F.; Nakagawa, S.; Sato, K.; Kon, K.; Sato, T.; Kaneta, Y. Net Greenhouse Gas Budget and Soil Carbon Storage in a Field with Paddy–Upland Rotation with Different History of Manure Application. Agriculture 2017, 7, 49.

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