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Agriculture 2016, 6(4), 55; doi:10.3390/agriculture6040055

Determinants of the Use of Certified Seed Potato among Smallholder Farmers: The Case of Potato Growers in Central and Eastern Kenya

1
International Potato Center, SSA regional office, P.O. Box 25171, Nairobi 00603, Kenya
2
Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland
3
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, Georg-August-University Goettingen, D-37073 Göttingen, Germany
4
Global Chemicals & Agriculture Practice, North American Knowledge Center, McKinsey & Company, Waltham, MA 02451, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Terence J. Centner
Received: 19 July 2016 / Revised: 2 October 2016 / Accepted: 6 October 2016 / Published: 24 October 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [235 KB, uploaded 24 October 2016]

Abstract

Potato yields in sub-Saharan Africa remain very low compared with those of developed countries. Yet potato is major food staple and source of income to the predominantly smallholder growing households in the tropical highlands of this region. A major cause of the low potato yields is the use of poor quality seed potato. This paper examines the factors determining the decision to use certified seed potato (CSP), as well as the intensity of its use, among potato growers with access to it. We focused on potato growers in the central highlands of Kenya and used regression analysis to test hypotheses relating to potential impediments of CSP use. The study found that the distance to the market (a proxy for transaction costs), household food insecurity, and asset endowment affect the decision to use CSP. However, the effect of the intensity of use of CSP depends on how the intensity variable is defined. Several other control variables also affect the decision and extent of CSP use. The study concludes that transaction costs, asset endowment, and household food insecurity play a major role in the decision by smallholder potato farmers to use CSP and the extent to which they do so. We also discuss the policy implications of the findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: smallholder farmers; seed systems; certified seed potato; use and intensity of use; Kenya smallholder farmers; seed systems; certified seed potato; use and intensity of use; Kenya
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Okello, J.J.; Zhou, Y.; Kwikiriza, N.; Ogutu, S.O.; Barker, I.; Schulte-Geldermann, E.; Atieno, E.; Ahmed, J.T. Determinants of the Use of Certified Seed Potato among Smallholder Farmers: The Case of Potato Growers in Central and Eastern Kenya. Agriculture 2016, 6, 55.

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