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Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 113; doi:10.3390/brainsci7090113

Connecting the Dots between Schizotypal Symptoms and Social Anxiety in Youth with an Extra X Chromosome: A Mediating Role for Catastrophizing

1
Developmental and Educational Psychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9555, 2300 RB Leiden, The Netherlands
2
Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9555, 2300 RB Leiden, The Netherlands
3
Department of Psychology, Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition (LIBC), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 30 August 2017 / Accepted: 2 September 2017 / Published: 6 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Anxiety Disorder in Emerging or Early Psychosis)
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Abstract

Youth with an extra X chromosome (47, XXY & 47, XXX) display higher levels of schizotypal symptoms and social anxiety as compared to typically developing youth. It is likely that the extra X chromosome group is at-risk for clinical levels of schizotypy and social anxiety. Hence, this study investigated how schizotypal and social anxiety symptoms are related and mechanisms that may explain their association in a group of 38 children and adolescents with an extra X chromosome and a comparison group of 109 typically developing peers (8–19 years). Three cognitive coping strategies were investigated as potential mediators, rumination, catastrophizing, and other-blame. Moderated mediation analyses revealed that the relationship between schizotypal symptoms and social anxiety was mediated by catastrophizing coping in the extra X chromosome group but not in the comparison group. The results suggest that youth with an extra X chromosome with schizotypal symptoms could benefit from an intervention to weaken the tendency to catastrophize life events as a way of reducing the likelihood of social anxiety symptoms. View Full-Text
Keywords: Klinefelter; Trisomy X; schizotypal symptoms; social anxiety symptoms; catastrophizing coping Klinefelter; Trisomy X; schizotypal symptoms; social anxiety symptoms; catastrophizing coping
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Miers, A.C.; Ziermans, T.; van Rijn, S. Connecting the Dots between Schizotypal Symptoms and Social Anxiety in Youth with an Extra X Chromosome: A Mediating Role for Catastrophizing. Brain Sci. 2017, 7, 113.

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