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Brain Sci. 2017, 7(10), 127; doi:10.3390/brainsci7100127

An Overview of Recent Findings on Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents and Young Adults at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

1
Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Piazza Sant’Onofrio 4, 00100 Rome, Italy
2
Office Médico-Pédagogique Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Geneva School of Medicine, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 September 2017 / Revised: 3 October 2017 / Accepted: 5 October 2017 / Published: 11 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Anxiety Disorder in Emerging or Early Psychosis)
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Abstract

Background: Some studies have shown that anxiety is particularly frequent in the Clinical High Risk (CHR) for psychosis population. Notably, social anxiety disorder is identified as one of the most common anxiety disorders in CHR adolescents and young adults. Despite this, the frequency and the clinical significance of social anxiety in this population have been underestimated. Methods: A selective review of literature published between 2011 and 2017 on social anxiety disorder in CHR adolescents and young adults. Results: Five studies are included. In particular, three studies demonstrated that CHR adolescents and young adults have higher levels of anxiety compared to controls. Furthermore, anxiety, including social anxiety, is related to the severity of psychotic symptoms. The other studies included show inconsistent results regarding the possible relationship between social anxiety and social functioning. Conclusions: To date, the eidence concerning the comorbidity of social anxiety disorder and CHR in adolescents and young adults is not sufficient to provide clear guidelines for clinical practice. Future longitudinal studies on larger samples of the CHR adolescents and young adults are required to examine the relationship between social anxiety disorder and the presence of attenuated psychotic symptomatology. View Full-Text
Keywords: social anxiety disorder; Clinical High Risk; social functioning; psychotic symptoms social anxiety disorder; Clinical High Risk; social functioning; psychotic symptoms
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Pontillo, M.; Guerrera, S.; Santonastaso, O.; Tata, M.C.; Averna, R.; Vicari, S.; Armando, M. An Overview of Recent Findings on Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents and Young Adults at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis. Brain Sci. 2017, 7, 127.

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