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Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 112; doi:10.3390/brainsci7090112

Computer versus Compensatory Calendar Training in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Functional Impact in a Pilot Study

1
Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA
2
Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
3
Naval Hospital Jacksonville Mental Health Department, 2080 Child Street, Jacksonville, FL 32214, USA
4
Mayo Clinic Minnesota, 200 1st St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
5
University of Florida, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 July 2017 / Revised: 30 August 2017 / Accepted: 31 August 2017 / Published: 6 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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Abstract

This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. Measures of adherence, memory-based activities of daily living (mADLs), and self-efficacy were completed. The calendar training group demonstrated significant improvement in mADLs compared to controls, while the computer training group did not. Calendar training may be more effective in improving mADLs than computerized intervention. However, this study highlights how behavioral trials with fewer than 30–50 participants per arm are likely underpowered, resulting in seemingly null findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: activities of daily living; behavioral rehabilitation; cognitive rehabilitation; mild cognitive impairment; self-efficacy activities of daily living; behavioral rehabilitation; cognitive rehabilitation; mild cognitive impairment; self-efficacy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chandler, M.J.; Locke, D.E.C.; Duncan, N.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Cuc, A.V.; Fields, J.A.; Hoffman Snyder, C.R.; Lunde, A.M.; Smith, G.E. Computer versus Compensatory Calendar Training in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Functional Impact in a Pilot Study. Brain Sci. 2017, 7, 112.

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