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Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 111; doi:10.3390/brainsci7090111

Problems in Classifying Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): One or Multiple Syndromes?

1
Department of Basic Psychology I, National University of Distance Education, Juan del Rosal 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Department of Behavioural Sciences Methodology, National University of Distance Education, Juan del Rosal 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Psychobiology, National University of Distance Education, Juan del Rosal 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 June 2017 / Revised: 31 July 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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Abstract

As the conceptual, methodological, and technological advances applied to dementias have evolved the construct of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), one problem encountered has been its classification into subtypes. Here, we aim to revise the concept of MCI and its subtypes, addressing the problems of classification not only from the psychometric point of view or by using alternative methods, such as latent class analysis, but also considering the absence of normative data. In addition to the well-known influence of certain factors on cognitive function, such as educational level and cultural traits, recent studies highlight the relevance of other factors that may significantly affect the genesis and evolution of MCI: subjective memory complaints, loneliness, social isolation, etc. The present work will contemplate the most relevant attempts to clarify the issue of MCI categorization and classification, combining our own data with that from recent studies which suggest the role of relevant psychosocial factors in MCI. View Full-Text
Keywords: classification methods; mild cognitive impairment; neuropsychological assessment; social factors; loneliness; subtypes classification methods; mild cognitive impairment; neuropsychological assessment; social factors; loneliness; subtypes
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Díaz-Mardomingo, M.C.; García-Herranz, S.; Rodríguez-Fernández, R.; Venero, C.; Peraita, H. Problems in Classifying Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): One or Multiple Syndromes? Brain Sci. 2017, 7, 111.

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