Next Article in Journal
Hippocampal Cortactin Levels are Reduced Following Spatial Working Memory Formation, an Effect Blocked by Chronic Calpain Inhibition
Next Article in Special Issue
Addendum: Shinozuka, K. et al. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke. Brain Sci. 2013, 3, 239–261
Previous Article in Journal
Acute Stress Dysregulates the LPP ERP Response to Emotional Pictures and Impairs Sustained Attention: Time-Sensitive Effects
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Hypothermic Influence on CHOP and Ero1-α in an Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Model of Cerebral Ischemia
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Brain Sci. 2015, 5(2), 220-240; doi:10.3390/brainsci5020220

Sex Differences in Behavioral Outcomes Following Temperature Modulation During Induced Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Injury in Rats

1
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bruno Meloni
Received: 6 March 2015 / Revised: 24 April 2015 / Accepted: 12 May 2015 / Published: 22 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotection against Ischemic Brain Injury)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [266 KB, uploaded 27 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain) can cause various degrees of tissue damage, as well as subsequent cognitive/behavioral deficits such as motor, learning/memory, and auditory impairments. These outcomes frequently result from cardiovascular and/or respiratory events observed in premature infants. Data suggests that there is a sex difference in HI outcome, with males being more adversely affected relative to comparably injured females. Brain/body temperature may play a role in modulating the severity of an HI insult, with hypothermia during an insult yielding more favorable anatomical and behavioral outcomes. The current study utilized a postnatal day (P) 7 rodent model of HI injury to assess the effect of temperature modulation during injury in each sex. We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats. We assessed all subjects on rota-rod, auditory discrimination, and spatial/non-spatial maze tasks. Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks. However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks. Our data suggest that temperature reduction protects both sexes from the deleterious effects of HI injury, but task and sex specific patterns of relative efficacy are seen. View Full-Text
Keywords: Temperature modulation; hypoxia ischemia; rodent model; rapid auditory processing; motor; learning/memory; preterm; neuroprotection; neurobehavioral; hypothermia Temperature modulation; hypoxia ischemia; rodent model; rapid auditory processing; motor; learning/memory; preterm; neuroprotection; neurobehavioral; hypothermia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Smith, A.L.; Garbus, H.; Rosenkrantz, T.S.; Fitch, R.H. Sex Differences in Behavioral Outcomes Following Temperature Modulation During Induced Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Injury in Rats. Brain Sci. 2015, 5, 220-240.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top