Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Representation of Linguistic Information Determines Its Susceptibility to Memory Interference
Previous Article in Journal
Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair
Previous Article in Special Issue
Neural Correlates of Processing Passive Sentences
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Brain Sci. 2013, 3(3), 1229-1243; doi:10.3390/brainsci3031229

The Neural Correlates of Abstract and Concrete Words: Evidence from Brain-Damaged Patients

Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1, Building U6, Milan 20126, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 May 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 22 July 2013 / Published: 7 August 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain and Language)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1054 KB, uploaded 7 August 2013]   |  

Abstract

Neuropsychological and activation studies on the neural correlates of abstract and concrete words have produced contrasting results. The present study explores the anatomical substrates of abstract/concrete words in 22 brain-damaged patients with a single vascular lesion either in the right or left hemisphere. One hundred and twenty (60 concrete and 60 abstract) noun triplets were used for a semantic similarity judgment task. We found a significant interaction in word type × group since left temporal brain-damaged patients performed significantly better with concrete than abstract words. Lesion mapping of patients with predominant temporal damage showed that the left superior and middle temporal gyri and the insula were the areas of major overlapping, while the anterior portion of the left temporal lobe was generally spared. Errors on abstract words mainly concerned (although at a non-significant level) semantically associate targets, while in the case of concrete words, coordinate targets were significantly more impaired than associate ones. Our results suggest that the left superior and middle temporal gyri and the insula are crucial regions in processing abstract words. They also confirm the hypothesis of a semantic similarity vs. associative organization of concrete and abstract concepts. View Full-Text
Keywords: concreteness; temporal lobe; insula; associative vs. categorical architecture concreteness; temporal lobe; insula; associative vs. categorical architecture
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Papagno, C.; Martello, G.; Mattavelli, G. The Neural Correlates of Abstract and Concrete Words: Evidence from Brain-Damaged Patients. Brain Sci. 2013, 3, 1229-1243.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top