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Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(6), 606; doi:10.3390/app7060606

Effects of Nozzle Configuration on Rock Erosion Under a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Jet at Various Pressures and Temperatures

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1
Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Machinery Transients, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
2
Hubei Key Laboratory of Waterjet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
3
School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose Augusto Paixao Coelho
Received: 18 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 9 June 2017 / Published: 12 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Applications of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4219 KB, uploaded 12 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

The supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) jet offers many advantages over water jets in the field of oil and gas exploration and development. To take better advantage of the SC-CO2 jet, effects of nozzle configuration on rock erosion characteristics were experimentally investigated with respect to the erosion volume. A convergent nozzle and two Laval nozzles, as well as artificial cores were employed in the experiments. It was found that the Laval nozzle can enhance rock erosion ability, which largely depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. The enhancement increases with rising inlet pressure. Compared with the convergent nozzle, the Laval-1 nozzle maximally enhances the erosion volume by 10%, 21.2% and 30.3% at inlet pressures of 30, 40 and 50 MPa, respectively; while the Laval-2 nozzle maximally increases the erosion volume by 32.5%, 49.2% and 60%. Moreover, the enhancement decreases with increasing ambient pressure under constant inlet pressure or constant pressure drop. The growth of fluid temperature above the critical value can increase the enhancement. In addition, the jet from the Laval-2 nozzle with a smooth inner profile always has a greater erosion ability than that from the Laval-1 nozzle. View Full-Text
Keywords: supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) jet; nozzle configuration; rock erosion; erosion volume; pressure and temperature conditions supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) jet; nozzle configuration; rock erosion; erosion volume; pressure and temperature conditions
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Huang, M.; Kang, Y.; Wang, X.; Hu, Y.; Li, D.; Cai, C.; Chen, F. Effects of Nozzle Configuration on Rock Erosion Under a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Jet at Various Pressures and Temperatures. Appl. Sci. 2017, 7, 606.

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