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Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 341-352; doi:10.3390/bs5030341

The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet

1
Department of Counseling and Human Services, St. Mary's University, One Camino Santa Maria, San Antonio, TX 78228, USA
2
Department of Psychology and Counseling, Texas A&M University—Central Texas, 1001 Leadership Place, Killeen, TX 76549, USA
3
START, 16307 NE 83rd Street Suite #208, Redmond, WA 98052, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andrew Doan
Received: 1 April 2015 / Revised: 6 July 2015 / Accepted: 22 July 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Behaviors: Assessment and Treatment)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [439 KB, uploaded 28 July 2015]

Abstract

The Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) was created to screen for potential addictive behaviors that could be facilitated by the internet. The IPAT was created with the mindset that the term “Internet addiction” is structurally problematic, as the Internet is simply the medium that one uses to access various addictive processes. The role of the internet in facilitating addictions, however, cannot be minimized. A new screening tool that effectively directed researchers and clinicians to the specific processes facilitated by the internet would therefore be useful. This study shows that the Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) demonstrates good validity and reliability. Four addictive processes were effectively screened for with the IPAT: Online video game playing, online social networking, online sexual activity, and web surfing. Implications for further research and limitations of the study are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: internet addiction; internet process addiction; online video games; online social networking; online sexual activity; problematic internet use internet addiction; internet process addiction; online video games; online social networking; online sexual activity; problematic internet use
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Northrup, J.C.; Lapierre, C.; Kirk, J.; Rae, C. The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet. Behav. Sci. 2015, 5, 341-352.

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