Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Behav. Sci., Volume 5, Issue 3 (September 2015), Pages 341-433

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial Advances in Environmental Psychology
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 384-387; doi:10.3390/bs5030384
Received: 7 September 2015 / Accepted: 7 September 2015 / Published: 9 September 2015
PDF Full-text (333 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
When Plenum stopped publishing its edited series—Human Behavior and Environment and Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design—the field of environmental psychology suffered a loss. Scholars could go to one of the edited Plenum books to find state-of-the-art reviews on existing and
[...] Read more.
When Plenum stopped publishing its edited series—Human Behavior and Environment and Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design—the field of environmental psychology suffered a loss. Scholars could go to one of the edited Plenum books to find state-of-the-art reviews on existing and emerging areas of research. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Psychology)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 341-352; doi:10.3390/bs5030341
Received: 1 April 2015 / Revised: 6 July 2015 / Accepted: 22 July 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (439 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) was created to screen for potential addictive behaviors that could be facilitated by the internet. The IPAT was created with the mindset that the term “Internet addiction” is structurally problematic, as the Internet is simply the medium
[...] Read more.
The Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) was created to screen for potential addictive behaviors that could be facilitated by the internet. The IPAT was created with the mindset that the term “Internet addiction” is structurally problematic, as the Internet is simply the medium that one uses to access various addictive processes. The role of the internet in facilitating addictions, however, cannot be minimized. A new screening tool that effectively directed researchers and clinicians to the specific processes facilitated by the internet would therefore be useful. This study shows that the Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) demonstrates good validity and reliability. Four addictive processes were effectively screened for with the IPAT: Online video game playing, online social networking, online sexual activity, and web surfing. Implications for further research and limitations of the study are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Behaviors: Assessment and Treatment)
Open AccessArticle Neural Adaptation Effects in Conceptual Processing
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 353-371; doi:10.3390/bs5030353
Received: 5 May 2015 / Revised: 10 July 2015 / Accepted: 22 July 2015 / Published: 31 July 2015
PDF Full-text (1649 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We investigated the conceptual processing of nouns referring to objects characterized by a highly typical color and orientation. We used a go/no-go task in which we asked participants to categorize each noun as referring or not to natural entities (e.g., animals) after a
[...] Read more.
We investigated the conceptual processing of nouns referring to objects characterized by a highly typical color and orientation. We used a go/no-go task in which we asked participants to categorize each noun as referring or not to natural entities (e.g., animals) after a selective adaptation of color-edge neurons in the posterior LV4 region of the visual cortex was induced by means of a McCollough effect procedure. This manipulation affected categorization: the green-vertical adaptation led to slower responses than the green-horizontal adaptation, regardless of the specific color and orientation of the to-be-categorized noun. This result suggests that the conceptual processing of natural entities may entail the activation of modality-specific neural channels with weights proportional to the reliability of the signals produced by these channels during actual perception. This finding is discussed with reference to the debate about the grounded cognition view. Full article
Open AccessArticle Refining Measures for Assessing Problematic/Addictive Digital Gaming Use in Clinical and Research Settings
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 372-383; doi:10.3390/bs5030372
Received: 1 June 2015 / Accepted: 6 August 2015 / Published: 12 August 2015
PDF Full-text (371 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Problematic or addictive digital gaming (including all types of electronic devices) can and has had extremely adverse impacts on the lives of many individuals across the world. The understanding of this phenomenon, and the effectiveness of treatment design and monitoring, can be improved
[...] Read more.
Problematic or addictive digital gaming (including all types of electronic devices) can and has had extremely adverse impacts on the lives of many individuals across the world. The understanding of this phenomenon, and the effectiveness of treatment design and monitoring, can be improved considerably by continuing refinement of assessment tools. The present article briefly overviews tools designed to measure problematic or addictive use of digital gaming, the vast majority of which are founded on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria for other addictive disorders, such as pathological gambling. Although adapting DSM content and strategies for measuring problematic digital gaming has proven valuable, there are some potential issues with this approach. We discuss the strengths and limitations of current methods for measuring problematic or addictive gaming and provide various recommendations that might help in enhancing or supplementing existing tools, or in developing new and even more effective tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Behaviors: Assessment and Treatment)

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessReview Neuroscience of Internet Pornography Addiction: A Review and Update
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(3), 388-433; doi:10.3390/bs5030388
Received: 2 July 2015 / Revised: 29 August 2015 / Accepted: 8 September 2015 / Published: 18 September 2015
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (679 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many recognize that several behaviors potentially affecting the reward circuitry in human brains lead to a loss of control and other symptoms of addiction in at least some individuals. Regarding Internet addiction, neuroscientific research supports the assumption that underlying neural processes are similar
[...] Read more.
Many recognize that several behaviors potentially affecting the reward circuitry in human brains lead to a loss of control and other symptoms of addiction in at least some individuals. Regarding Internet addiction, neuroscientific research supports the assumption that underlying neural processes are similar to substance addiction. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has recognized one such Internet related behavior, Internet gaming, as a potential addictive disorder warranting further study, in the 2013 revision of their Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Other Internet related behaviors, e.g., Internet pornography use, were not covered. Within this review, we give a summary of the concepts proposed underlying addiction and give an overview about neuroscientific studies on Internet addiction and Internet gaming disorder. Moreover, we reviewed available neuroscientific literature on Internet pornography addiction and connect the results to the addiction model. The review leads to the conclusion that Internet pornography addiction fits into the addiction framework and shares similar basic mechanisms with substance addiction. Together with studies on Internet addiction and Internet Gaming Disorder we see strong evidence for considering addictive Internet behaviors as behavioral addiction. Future research needs to address whether or not there are specific differences between substance and behavioral addiction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Behaviors: Assessment and Treatment)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Behavioral Sciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Behavioral Sciences Edit a special issue Review for Behavioral Sciences
loading...
Back to Top