Next Article in Journal
The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet
Previous Article in Journal
“Bad Romance”: Links between Psychological and Physical Aggression and Relationship Functioning in Adolescent Couples
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 324-340; doi:10.3390/bs5020324

Body Mass Index and Sociodemographic Predictors of School Lunch Purchase Behavior during a Year-Long Environmental Intervention in Middle School

1
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany Street, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3
Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, 1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
4
Department of Health Sciences, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: John Coverdale
Received: 26 April 2015 / Revised: 1 June 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 10 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Behaviors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [529 KB, uploaded 10 June 2015]

Abstract

Modifying the school food environment is on the national agenda as one strategy to improve the nutritional quality of children’s diets. Because few environmental-level interventions have been rigorously evaluated, the evidence base to inform programs and policies is limited. Of concern is the impact that changes to cafeteria offerings will have on participation in school meal programs. This study evaluates school lunch participation in the setting of a year-long middle school cafeteria intervention by examining the association between body mass index (BMI), sociodemographics, and the purchases of school lunch meals. IMOVE meals were healthier choices that met stringent nutritional criteria and were offered alongside standard lunch meals. Students who were overweight had a significantly higher purchase rate for both types of meals compared to those with a healthy BMI. Non-white race, younger age, being male, and low-income status were also significantly associated with participation in school lunch. Results indicate that nutritionally vulnerable students participate in school lunch and are equally likely to buy healthy alternatives or standard meals. This behavioral observation has important implications for school foodservice programs and policies. These results are timely given recent federal legislation to improve the school food environment to influence students’ food choice behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: child nutrition; school foodservice; body mass index; environmental intervention; school lunch participation; nutrition policy child nutrition; school foodservice; body mass index; environmental intervention; school lunch participation; nutrition policy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Greece, J.A.; Kratze, A.; DeJong, W.; Cozier, Y.C.; Quatromoni, P.A. Body Mass Index and Sociodemographic Predictors of School Lunch Purchase Behavior during a Year-Long Environmental Intervention in Middle School. Behav. Sci. 2015, 5, 324-340.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Behav. Sci. EISSN 2076-328X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top