Next Issue

Table of Contents

Geosciences, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2011), Pages 1-43

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Geosciences: An Open Access Journal on Earth and Planetary Sciences and Their Interdisciplinary Approaches
Geosciences 2011, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/geosciences1010001
Received: 17 May 2011 / Accepted: 25 May 2011 / Published: 25 May 2011
PDF Full-text (121 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
On behalf of the Editorial Board and the editorial management staff of MDPI, it is my great pleasure to introduce this new journal Geosciences. Geosciences is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal, which publishes original papers, rapid communications, technical notes and review articles,
[...] Read more.
On behalf of the Editorial Board and the editorial management staff of MDPI, it is my great pleasure to introduce this new journal Geosciences. Geosciences is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal, which publishes original papers, rapid communications, technical notes and review articles, and discussions about all interdisciplinary aspects of the earth and planetary sciences. Geosciences may also include papers presented at scientific conferences (proceedings) or articles on a well defined topic assembled by individual editors or organizations/institutions (special publications). Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle The Central Italy Electromagnetic Network and the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake: Observed Electric Activity
Geosciences 2011, 1(1), 3-25; doi:10.3390/geosciences1010003
Received: 19 September 2011 / Revised: 31 October 2011 / Accepted: 5 December 2011 / Published: 8 December 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (14509 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A network of low frequency electromagnetic detectors has been operating in Central Italy for more than three years, consisting of identical instruments that continuously record the electrical components of the electromagnetic field, ranging from a few Hz to tens of kHz. These signals
[...] Read more.
A network of low frequency electromagnetic detectors has been operating in Central Italy for more than three years, consisting of identical instruments that continuously record the electrical components of the electromagnetic field, ranging from a few Hz to tens of kHz. These signals are analyzed in real time and their power spectrum contents and time/frequency data are available online. To date, specific interest has been devoted to searching for any possible electromagnetic features which correlate with seismic activity in the same region. In this study, spectral analysis has evidenced very distinct power spectrum signatures that increased in intensity when strong seismic activity occurred near the stations of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. These signatures have revealed horizontally oriented electric fields, between 20 Hz to 400 Hz, lasting from several minutes to up to two hours. Their power intensities have been found to be about 1 μV/m. Moreover, a large number of man-made signals and meteorologic electric perturbations were recorded. Anthropogenic signatures have come from power line disturbances at 50 Hz and higher harmonics up to several kHz, while radio transmissions have influenced the higher kHz spectrum. Reception from low frequency transmitters is also provided in relation to seismic activity. Meteorologic signatures cover the lower frequency band through phenomena such as spherics, Schumann resonances and rain electrical perturbations. All of these phenomena are useful teaching tools for introducing students to this invisible electromagnetic world. Full article
Open AccessArticle Geoscience of the Built Environment: Pollutants and Materials Surfaces
Geosciences 2011, 1(1), 26-43; doi:10.3390/geosciences1010026
Received: 9 December 2011 / Accepted: 18 December 2011 / Published: 20 December 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (409 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An overview of issues with environmental relevance that arise from the interaction between pollutants and surfaces of the built environment is presented in this paper. Two broad perspectives are considered: decay of materials and recording of pollution characteristics. In relation to the former,
[...] Read more.
An overview of issues with environmental relevance that arise from the interaction between pollutants and surfaces of the built environment is presented in this paper. Two broad perspectives are considered: decay of materials and recording of pollution characteristics. In relation to the former, we consider the possible implications on human activities restrictions, materials and morphological options, consumption of resources and release of pollutants resulting from the alteration of materials, conservation and restoration procedures. In terms of pollution recording, the interest of the stony materials as passive monitors of pollution, the question of heterogeneous conditions on buildings and the interest of qualitative and quantitative studies are highlighted. The importance of longitudinal studies on new and cleaned surfaces is considered, both for the understanding of materials decay and for the assessment of pollution conditions. The use of tracers to record the characteristics of pollution sources, interaction with materials and pathways of pollutants is also discussed. Finally, some recommendations are presented, based on the issues discussed on this paper that might be relevant for environmental management programs, including environmental education. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Geosciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
geosciences@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Geosciences
Back to Top