Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Geosciences, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2012), Pages 1-10

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessCommunication The Extinction of the Conulariids
Geosciences 2012, 2(1), 1-10; doi:10.3390/geosciences2010001
Received: 22 February 2012 / Revised: 12 March 2012 / Accepted: 15 March 2012 / Published: 22 March 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2283 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conulariids are unusual extinct metazoans most often considered to be a group of scyphozoan cnidarians or close relatives. Generally, the temporal range of conulariid fossils is perceived to be late Precambrian or Cambrian to Triassic, though a supposed Cretaceous conulariid from Peru [...] Read more.
Conulariids are unusual extinct metazoans most often considered to be a group of scyphozoan cnidarians or close relatives. Generally, the temporal range of conulariid fossils is perceived to be late Precambrian or Cambrian to Triassic, though a supposed Cretaceous conulariid from Peru was published 46 years ago. A re-evaluation of this fossil indicates it is not a conulariid, but instead a pinnacean bivalve (Pinna sp.), confirming that the geologically youngest conulariids are of Late Triassic age. However, a review of the Triassic conulariid fossil record indicates it is very sparse, with only eight published records. It does not provide a reliable basis for analyzing the structure of conulariid extinction. Nevertheless, conulariid extinction still appears to have taken place very close to the end of the Triassic. The cause of conulariid extinction may have been the onset of the Mesozoic marine revolution, in which durivorous predators developed new mechanisms for preying on the epifaunal benthos, including the conulariids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paleontology and Geo/Biological Evolution)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Geosciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
geosciences@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Geosciences
Back to Top