Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Alternatives to Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture: An Ecoimmunological View
Previous Article in Journal
Alternatives to Antibiotics in Semen Extenders: A Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Pathogens 2014, 3(4), 947-956; doi:10.3390/pathogens3040947

Effect of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors on a Bile Salt Hydrolase from Lactobacillus acidophilus

Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, TN, 37996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 November 2014 / Revised: 11 December 2014 / Accepted: 12 December 2014 / Published: 17 December 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternatives to Antibiotics: Current Strategies and Future Prospects)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [620 KB, uploaded 17 December 2014]   |  

Abstract

Bile salt hydrolase (BSH), a widely distributed function of the gut microbiota, has a profound impact on host lipid metabolism and energy harvest. Recent studies suggest that BSH inhibitors are promising alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) for enhanced animal growth performance and food safety. Using a high-purity BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we have identified a panel of BSH inhibitors. However, it is still unknown if these inhibitors also effectively inhibit the function of the BSH enzymes from other bacterial species with different sequence and substrate spectrum. In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis and determined the inhibitory effect of identified BSH inhibitors on a BSH from L. acidophilus. Although the L. acidophilus BSH is phylogenetically distant from the L. salivarius BSH, sequence analysis and structure modeling indicated the two BSH enzymes contain conserved, catalytically important amino residues and domain. His-tagged recombinant BSH from L. acidophilus was further purified and used to determine inhibitory effect of specific compounds. Previously identified BSH inhibitors also exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the L. acidophilus BSH. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the BSH from L. salivarius is an ideal candidate for screening BSH inhibitors, the promising alternatives to AGP for enhanced feed efficiency, growth performance and profitability of food animals. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotic growth promoter; alternative; bile salt hydrolase; inhibitor; high-throughput screening; probiotics antibiotic growth promoter; alternative; bile salt hydrolase; inhibitor; high-throughput screening; probiotics
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lin, J.; Negga, R.; Zeng, X.; Smith, K. Effect of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors on a Bile Salt Hydrolase from Lactobacillus acidophilus. Pathogens 2014, 3, 947-956.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Pathogens EISSN 2076-0817 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top