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Sports 2015, 3(1), 12-20; doi:10.3390/sports3010012

Effect of Level and Downhill Running on Breathing Efficiency

Department of Sport & Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, West Sussex PO19 6PE, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Arno Schmidt-Trucksäss
Received: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 14 January 2015 / Published: 23 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Medicine)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [494 KB, uploaded 23 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

Ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide are physiological measures of breathing efficiency, and are known to be affected by the intensity and mode of exercise. We examined the effect of level running (gradient 0%) and muscle-damaging downhill running (−12%), matched for oxygen uptake, on the ventilatory equivalents for oxygen () and carbon dioxide (). Nine men (27 ± 9 years, 179 ± 7 cm, 75 ± 12 kg, : 52.0 ± 7.7 mL·kg−1·min−1) completed two 40-min running bouts (5 × 8-min with 2-min inter-bout rest), one level and one downhill. Running intensity was matched at 60% of maximal metabolic equivalent. Maximal isometric force of m.quadriceps femoris was measured before and after the running bouts. Data was analyzed with 2-way ANOVA or paired samples t-tests. Running speed (downhill: 13.5 ± 3.2, level: 9.6 ± 2.2 km·h−1) and isometric force deficits (downhill: 17.2 ± 7.6%, level: 2.0 ± 6.9%) were higher for downhill running. Running bouts for level and downhill gradients had , heart rates and respiratory exchange ratio values that were not different indicating matched intensity and metabolic demands. During downhill running, the , (downhill: 29.7 ± 3.3, level: 27.2 ± 1.6) and (downhill: 33.3 ± 2.7, level: 30.4 ± 1.9) were 7.1% and 8.3% higher (p < 0.05) than level running. In conclusion, breathing efficiency appears lower during downhill running (i.e., muscle-damaging exercise) compared to level running at a similar moderate intensity. View Full-Text
Keywords: eccentric exercise; muscle damage; ventilatory equivalent; metabolic equivalent; moderate intensity; treadmill running eccentric exercise; muscle damage; ventilatory equivalent; metabolic equivalent; moderate intensity; treadmill running
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Cook, M.D.; Myers, S.D.; Kelly, J.S.M.; Willems, M.E.T. Effect of Level and Downhill Running on Breathing Efficiency. Sports 2015, 3, 12-20.

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