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Minerals 2018, 8(5), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050209

The Carbonation of Wollastonite: A Model Reaction to Test Natural and Biomimetic Catalysts for Enhanced CO2 Sequestration

1
Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany
3
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Surface Reactions at the Nanoscale)
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Abstract

One of the most promising strategies for the safe and permanent disposal of anthropogenic CO2 is its conversion into carbonate minerals via the carbonation of calcium and magnesium silicates. However, the mechanism of such a reaction is not well constrained, and its slow kinetics is a handicap for the implementation of silicate mineral carbonation as an effective method for CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Here, we studied the different steps of wollastonite (CaSiO3) carbonation (silicate dissolution → carbonate precipitation) as a model CCS system for the screening of natural and biomimetic catalysts for this reaction. Tested catalysts included carbonic anhydrase (CA), a natural enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2(aq), and biomimetic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Our results show that dissolution is the rate-limiting step for wollastonite carbonation. The overall reaction progresses anisotropically along different [hkl] directions via a pseudomorphic interface-coupled dissolution–precipitation mechanism, leading to partial passivation via secondary surface precipitation of amorphous silica and calcite, which in both cases is anisotropic (i.e., (hkl)-specific). CA accelerates the final carbonate precipitation step but hinders the overall carbonation of wollastonite. Remarkably, one of the tested Zr-based MOFs accelerates the dissolution of the silicate. The use of MOFs for enhanced silicate dissolution alone or in combination with other natural or biomimetic catalysts for accelerated carbonation could represent a potentially effective strategy for enhanced mineral CCS. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbonation; wollastonite; catalysts; carbonic anhydrase; MOFs; carbon capture and storage carbonation; wollastonite; catalysts; carbonic anhydrase; MOFs; carbon capture and storage
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Di Lorenzo, F.; Ruiz-Agudo, C.; Ibañez-Velasco, A.; Gil-San Millán, R.; Navarro, J.A.R.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C. The Carbonation of Wollastonite: A Model Reaction to Test Natural and Biomimetic Catalysts for Enhanced CO2 Sequestration. Minerals 2018, 8, 209.

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