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Minerals, Volume 4, Issue 3 (September 2014), Pages 565-757

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Silicon-Rich, Iron Oxide Microtubular Sheath Produced by an Iron-Oxidizing Bacterium, Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1, in Culture
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 565-577; doi:10.3390/min4030565
Received: 11 April 2014 / Revised: 3 June 2014 / Accepted: 23 June 2014 / Published: 27 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to manipulate the texture and elemental composition of the novel sheaths produced by the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix in culture by altering components of the medium. When previously isolated strain OUMS1 was cultured in media (pH 7.0 throughout incubation) containing various
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This study aimed to manipulate the texture and elemental composition of the novel sheaths produced by the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix in culture by altering components of the medium. When previously isolated strain OUMS1 was cultured in media (pH 7.0 throughout incubation) containing various levels of Si on a rotary shaker at 20 °C and 70 rpm for 14 days, the strain was able to reproduce in media with up to 300 ppm Si, and the hollow microtubular architecture of the sheath was maintained even at 300 ppm Si. The constitutional iron oxide phase changed from poorly crystalline lepidocrocite at 0 ppm Si to X-ray diffraction (XRD)-amorphous 2-line ferrihydrite at 100–300 ppm via their mixture phase with intermediate Si content (Si-30 and -50 ppm). The results strongly indicate that the chemical character and crystallinity of the sheath texture can be regulated by culture conditions, especially components of the medium. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evolution of Geochemical and Mineralogical Parameters during In Situ Remediation of a Marine Shore Tailings Deposit by the Implementation of a Wetland Cover
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 578-602; doi:10.3390/min4030578
Received: 27 February 2014 / Revised: 23 June 2014 / Accepted: 24 June 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (7382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We present data of the time-evolution of a remediation approach on a marine shore tailings deposit by the implementation of an artificial wetland. Two remediation cells were constructed: one in the northern area at sea-level and one in the central delta area (above
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We present data of the time-evolution of a remediation approach on a marine shore tailings deposit by the implementation of an artificial wetland. Two remediation cells were constructed: one in the northern area at sea-level and one in the central delta area (above sea-level) of the tailings. At the beginning, the “sea-level” remediation cell had a low pH (3.1), with high concentrations of dissolved metals and sulfate and chloride ions and showed sandy grain size. After wetland implementation, the “sea-level” remediation cell was rapidly water-saturated, the acidity was consumed, and after four months the efficiency of metal removal from solution was up to 79.5%–99.4% for Fe, 94.6%–99.9% for Mn, and 96.1%–99.6% for Zn. Al and Cu concentrations decreased below detection limit. The “above sea-level” remediation cell was characterized by the same pH (3.1) and finer grain size (clayey–silty), and with some lower element concentrations than in the “sea-level” cell. Even after one year of flooding, the “above sea-level” cell was not completely flooded, showing on-going sulfide oxidation in between the wetland cover and the groundwater level; the pH increased only to 4.4 and metal concentrations decreased only by 96% for Fe, 88% for Al, 51% for Cu, 97% for Mn, and 95% for Zn. During a dry period, the water level dropped in the “sea-level” cell, resulting in a seawater ingression, which triggered the desorption of As into solution. These data show that the applied remediation approach for this tailings deposit is successful, if the system is maintained water-saturated. Metal removal from solution was possible in both systems: first, as a result of sorption on Fe(III) hydroxide/and/or clay minerals and/or co-precipitation processes after rise of pH; and then, with more reducing conditions, due to metal sulfides precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Waste Characterization, Management and Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle Liberation of Adsorbed and Co-Precipitated Arsenic from Jarosite, Schwertmannite, Ferrihydrite, and Goethite in Seawater
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 603-620; doi:10.3390/min4030603
Received: 10 March 2014 / Revised: 17 June 2014 / Accepted: 18 June 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sea level rise is able to change the geochemical conditions in coastal systems. In these environments, transport of contaminants can be controlled by the stability and adsorption capacity of iron oxides. The behavior of adsorbed and co-precipitated arsenic in jarosite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, and
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Sea level rise is able to change the geochemical conditions in coastal systems. In these environments, transport of contaminants can be controlled by the stability and adsorption capacity of iron oxides. The behavior of adsorbed and co-precipitated arsenic in jarosite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, and goethite in sea water (common secondary minerals in coastal tailings) was investigated. The aim of the investigation was to establish As retention and transport under a marine flood scenario, which may occur due to climate change. Natural and synthetic minerals with co-precipitated and adsorbed As were contacted with seawater for 25 days. During this period As, Fe, Cl, SO4, and pH levels were constantly measured. The larger retention capability of samples with co-precipitated As, in relation with adsorbed As samples, reflects the different kinetics between diffusion, dissolution, and surface exchange processes. Ferrihydrite and schwertmannite showed good results in retaining arsenic, although schwertmannite holding capacity was enhanced due its buffering capacity, which prevented reductive dissolution throughout the experiment. Arsenic desorption from goethite could be understood in terms of ion exchange between oxides and electrolytes, due to the charge difference generated by a low point-of-zero-charge and the change in stability of surface complexes between synthesis conditions and natural media. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Waste Characterization, Management and Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle Burial Diagenesis of Magnetic Minerals: New Insights from the Grès d’Annot Transect (SE France)
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 667-689; doi:10.3390/min4030667
Received: 24 February 2014 / Revised: 14 May 2014 / Accepted: 17 June 2014 / Published: 10 July 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2674 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The diagenetic evolution of the magnetic minerals during burial in sedimentary basins has been recently proposed. In this study, we provide new data from the Grès d’Annot basin, SE France. We analyze fine-grained clastic rocks that suffered a burial temperature from ~60 to
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The diagenetic evolution of the magnetic minerals during burial in sedimentary basins has been recently proposed. In this study, we provide new data from the Grès d’Annot basin, SE France. We analyze fine-grained clastic rocks that suffered a burial temperature from ~60 to >250 °C, i.e., covering oil and gas windows. Low temperature magnetic measurements (10–300 K), coupled with vitrinite reflectance data, aim at defining the magnetic mineral evolution through the burial history. Magnetite is documented throughout the entire studied transect. Goethite, probably occurring as nanoparticles, is found for a burial temperature <80 °C. Micron-sized pyrrhotite is highlighted for a burial temperature >200 °C below the Alpine nappes and the Penninic Front. A model of the evolution of the magnetic assemblage from 60 to >250 °C is proposed for clastic rocks, containing iron sulfides (pyrite) and organic matter. This work provides the grounds for a better understanding of the magnetic properties of petroleum plays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Minerals in the Environment)
Open AccessArticle Quantum-Mechanical Methods for Quantifying Incorporation of Contaminants in Proximal Minerals
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 690-715; doi:10.3390/min4030690
Received: 7 March 2014 / Revised: 29 May 2014 / Accepted: 25 June 2014 / Published: 14 July 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Incorporation reactions play an important role in dictating immobilization and release pathways for chemical species in low-temperature geologic environments. Quantum-mechanical investigations of incorporation seek to characterize the stability and geometry of incorporated structures, as well as the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions
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Incorporation reactions play an important role in dictating immobilization and release pathways for chemical species in low-temperature geologic environments. Quantum-mechanical investigations of incorporation seek to characterize the stability and geometry of incorporated structures, as well as the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions themselves. For a thermodynamic treatment of incorporation reactions, a source of the incorporated ion and a sink for the released ion is necessary. These sources/sinks in a real geochemical system can be solids, but more commonly, they are charged aqueous species. In this contribution, we review the current methods for ab initio calculations of incorporation reactions, many of which do not consider incorporation from aqueous species. We detail a recently-developed approach for the calculation of incorporation reactions and expand on the part that is modeling the interaction of periodic solids with aqueous source and sink phases and present new research using this approach. To model these interactions, a systematic series of calculations must be done to transform periodic solid source and sink phases to aqueous-phase clusters. Examples of this process are provided for three case studies: (1) neptunyl incorporation into studtite and boltwoodite: for the layered boltwoodite, the incorporation energies are smaller (more favorable) for reactions using environmentally relevant source and sink phases (i.e., ΔErxn(oxides) > ΔErxn(silicates) > ΔErxn(aqueous)). Estimates of the solid-solution behavior of Np5+/P5+- and U6+/Si4+-boltwoodite and Np5+/Ca2+- and U6+/K+-boltwoodite solid solutions are used to predict the limit of Np-incorporation into boltwoodite (172 and 768 ppm at 300 °C, respectively); (2) uranyl and neptunyl incorporation into carbonates and sulfates: for both carbonates and sulfates, it was found that actinyl incorporation into a defect site is more favorable than incorporation into defect-free periodic structures. In addition, actinyl incorporation into carbonates with aragonite structure is more favorable than into carbonates with calcite structure; and (3) uranium incorporation into magnetite: within the configurations tested that preserve charge neutrality (U6+ → 2Fe3+oct/tet or U4+ → Fe2+oct), uranium incorporation into magnetite is most favorable when U6+ replaces octahedral Fe3+ with charge balancing accomplished by an octahedral Fe3+ iron vacancy. At the end of this article, the limitations of this method and important sources of error inherent in these calculations (e.g., hydration energies) are discussed. Overall, this method and examples may serve as a guide for future studies of incorporation in a variety of contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low-temperature Computational Mineralogy)
Open AccessArticle Linking Environmental Magnetism to Geochemical Studies and Management of Trace Metals. Examples from Fluvial, Estuarine and Marine Systems
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 716-745; doi:10.3390/min4030716
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 17 June 2014 / Accepted: 6 July 2014 / Published: 23 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5466 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Among the diverse research fields and wide range of studies encompassed by environmental magnetism, the present work elaborates on critical aspects of the geochemistry of trace metals that emerged through years of original research in a variety of environmental compartments. This review aims
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Among the diverse research fields and wide range of studies encompassed by environmental magnetism, the present work elaborates on critical aspects of the geochemistry of trace metals that emerged through years of original research in a variety of environmental compartments. This review aims at sharing the insights gained on (a) tracing metal pollution sources; and (b) identifying processes and transport pathways from sources to depositional environments. Case studies on the Elefsis Gulf (Greece) and the Gulf of Lions (France) demonstrate the potential of combined magnetic measurements and chemical analysis to trace pollution signals resulting from land-based sources and atmospheric deposition. Case studies on estuarine environments, namely the Louros, Acheloos, and Asopos Estuaries (Greece), address modes of trace metal behavior under the influence of different hydrological regimes and elucidate in situ processes within the transitional estuarine zone, that define their ultimate fate. As sources, transport pathways, and processes of trace metals are fundamental in environmental management assessments, the involvement of magnetic measurements in the policy cycle could facilitate the development and implementation of appropriate regulatory measures for the integrated management of river basins, coastal, and marine areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Minerals in the Environment)
Open AccessArticle Technological Proposals for Recycling Industrial Wastes for Environmental Applications
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 746-757; doi:10.3390/min4030746
Received: 30 May 2014 / Revised: 15 July 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (651 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A two-fold objective is proposed for this research: removing hazardous and unpleasant wastes and mitigating the emissions of green house gasses in the atmosphere. Thus, the first aim of this work is to identify, characterize and recycle industrial wastes with high contents of
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A two-fold objective is proposed for this research: removing hazardous and unpleasant wastes and mitigating the emissions of green house gasses in the atmosphere. Thus, the first aim of this work is to identify, characterize and recycle industrial wastes with high contents of calcium or sodium. This involves synthesizing materials with the ability for CO2 sequestration as preliminary work for designing industrial processes, which involve a reduction of CO2 emissions. In this regard, phosphogypsum from the fertilizer industry and liquid wastes from the green olive and bauxite industries have been considered as precursors. Following a very simple procedure, Ca-bearing phosphogypsum wastes are mixed with Na-bearing liquid wastes in order to obtain a harmless liquid phase and an active solid phase, which may act as a carbon sequestration agent. In this way, wastes, which are unable to fix CO2 by themselves, can be successfully turned into effective CO2 sinks. The CO2 sequestration efficiency and the CO2 fixation power of the procedure based on these wastes are assessed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation: Challenges and Advances)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Evolution of Acid Mine Drainage Formation in Sulphidic Mine Tailings
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 621-641; doi:10.3390/min4030621
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 21 April 2014 / Accepted: 21 April 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (1925 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sulphidic mine tailings are among the largest mining wastes on Earth and are prone to produce acid mine drainage (AMD). The formation of AMD is a sequence of complex biogeochemical and mineral dissolution processes. It can be classified in three main steps occurring
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Sulphidic mine tailings are among the largest mining wastes on Earth and are prone to produce acid mine drainage (AMD). The formation of AMD is a sequence of complex biogeochemical and mineral dissolution processes. It can be classified in three main steps occurring from the operational phase of a tailings impoundment until the final appearance of AMD after operations ceased: (1) During the operational phase of a tailings impoundment the pH-Eh regime is normally alkaline to neutral and reducing (water-saturated). Associated environmental problems include the presence of high sulphate concentrations due to dissolution of gypsum-anhydrite, and/or effluents enriched in elements such as Mo and As, which desorbed from primary ferric hydroxides during the alkaline flotation process. (2) Once mining-related operations of the tailings impoundment has ceased, sulphide oxidation starts, resulting in the formation of an acidic oxidation zone and a ferrous iron-rich plume below the oxidation front, that re-oxidises once it surfaces, producing the first visible sign of AMD, i.e., the precipitation of ferrihydrite and concomitant acidification. (3) Consumption of the (reactive) neutralization potential of the gangue minerals and subsequent outflow of acidic, heavy metal-rich leachates from the tailings is the final step in the evolution of an AMD system. The formation of multi-colour efflorescent salts can be a visible sign of this stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Waste Characterization, Management and Remediation)
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Open AccessReview Submarine Tailings Disposal (STD)—A Review
Minerals 2014, 4(3), 642-666; doi:10.3390/min4030642
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 24 May 2014 / Accepted: 9 June 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (918 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mining industry is a fundamental industry involved in the development of modern society, but is also the world’s largest waste producer. This role will be enhanced in the future, because ore grades are generally decreasing, thus leading to increases in the waste/metal
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The mining industry is a fundamental industry involved in the development of modern society, but is also the world’s largest waste producer. This role will be enhanced in the future, because ore grades are generally decreasing, thus leading to increases in the waste/metal production ratio. Mine wastes deposited on-land in so-called tailings dams, impoundments or waste-dumps have several associated environmental issues that need to be addressed (e.g., acid mine drainage formation due to sulphide oxidation, geotechnical stability, among others), and social concerns due to land use during mining. The mining industry recognizes these concerns and is searching for waste management alternatives for the future. One option used in the past was the marine shore or shallow submarine deposition of this waste material in some parts of the world. After the occurrence of some severe environmental pollution, today the deposition in the deep sea (under constant reducing conditions) is seen as a new, more secure option, due to the general thought that sulphide minerals are geochemically stable under the reduced conditions prevailing in the deep marine environment. This review highlights the mineralogical and geochemical issues (e.g., solubility of sulphides in seawater; reductive dissolution of oxide minerals under reducing conditions), which have to be considered when evaluating whether submarine tailings disposal is a suitable alternative for mine waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Waste Characterization, Management and Remediation)
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