Next Article in Journal
Spatio-Temporal Variation and Controlling Factors of Water Quality in Yongding River Replenished by Reclaimed Water in Beijing, North China
Previous Article in Journal
Modeling the Fate and Transport of Malathion in the Pagsanjan-Lumban Basin, Philippines
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2017, 9(7), 455; doi:10.3390/w9070455

Combined Impact of Acute Exposure to Ammonia and Temperature Stress on the Freshwater Mussel Unio pictorum

1
Aquatic Systems Biology Unit, Technical University of Munich, School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Muehlenweg 22, D-85350 Freising, Germany
2
Laboratory of Applied Physiology, Department of Aquatic Production, ICBAS-Abel Salazar Institute for Biomedical Sciences—University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
3
CIIMAR—Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research—University of Porto—Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 April 2017 / Revised: 8 June 2017 / Accepted: 20 June 2017 / Published: 23 June 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1467 KB, uploaded 27 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

Nitrogen compounds, particularly ammonia, and temperature are suspected major stressors for aquatic organisms, but little is known about their impact on globally declining freshwater mussels (Unionoida). In this study, we tested the combined effects of ammonia and temperature stress on painter’s mussel (Unio pictorum) survival, filtration behavior, hemocyte abundance, hemocyte mortality and glycogen energy status, at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 9.0 mg·L1 total ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) in 96 h acute exposures at two temperatures, 17 °C and 25 °C and a pH of 8.8. The results indicate a low sensitivity of U. pictorum to elevated ammonia concentrations after short-term exposure, although effects on cell morphology were evident and delayed mortality occurred at the highest test concentration. Most pronounced effects were observed for sublethal physiological endpoints due to elevated temperature, but no synergistic effects with ammonia were evident. Temperature increase resulted in significant effects on tissue glycogen, hyalinocyte mortality and clearance rates. Hemocyte mortalities showed a linear dependency on initial mussel activity as measured by their clearance rate. Since the main stressors tested in this study, ammonia and temperature, are predicted to increase in most freshwater ecosystems, their impact on other freshwater mussel species including different life-stages should be comprehensively assessed. View Full-Text
Keywords: water quality; freshwater mussel; unionid; ecotoxicology; combined stressor effects; sublethal effects water quality; freshwater mussel; unionid; ecotoxicology; combined stressor effects; sublethal effects
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Beggel, S.; Hinzmann, M.; Machado, J.; Geist, J. Combined Impact of Acute Exposure to Ammonia and Temperature Stress on the Freshwater Mussel Unio pictorum. Water 2017, 9, 455.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top