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Water 2017, 9(3), 179; doi:10.3390/w9030179

Assessing the Impact of Recycled Water Quality and Clogging on Infiltration Rates at A Pioneering Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) Site in Alice Springs, Northern Territory (NT), Australia

1
CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae 5064, SA, Australia
2
Departamento de Geologia Aplicada, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rio Claro 13506, SP, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pieter J. Stuyfzand
Received: 16 December 2016 / Revised: 27 February 2017 / Accepted: 27 February 2017 / Published: 2 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Considerations for Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems)
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Abstract

Infiltration techniques for managed aquifer recharge (MAR), such as soil aquifer treatment (SAT) can facilitate low-cost water recycling and supplement groundwater resources. However there are still challenges in sustaining adequate infiltration rates in the presence of lower permeability sediments, especially when wastewater containing suspended solids and nutrients is used to recharge the aquifer. To gain a better insight into reductions in infiltration rates during MAR, a field investigation was carried out via soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using recharge basins located within a mixture of fine and coarse grained riverine deposits in Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. A total of 2.6 Mm3 was delivered via five SAT basins over six years; this evaluation focused on three years of operation (2011–2014), recharging 1.5 Mm3 treated wastewater via an expanded recharge area of approximately 38,400 m2. Average infiltration rates per basin varied from 0.1 to 1 m/day due to heterogeneous soil characteristics and variability in recharge water quality. A treatment upgrade to include sand filtration and UV disinfection (in 2013) prior to recharge improved the average infiltration rate per basin by 40% to 100%. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil aquifer treatment; clogging; infiltration rates; managed aquifer recharge soil aquifer treatment; clogging; infiltration rates; managed aquifer recharge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barry, K.E.; Vanderzalm, J.L.; Miotlinski, K.; Dillon, P.J. Assessing the Impact of Recycled Water Quality and Clogging on Infiltration Rates at A Pioneering Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) Site in Alice Springs, Northern Territory (NT), Australia. Water 2017, 9, 179.

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