Next Article in Journal
Estimating the Impact of Drought on Groundwater Resources of the Marshall Islands
Next Article in Special Issue
The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Transnational Municipal Networks in Transboundary Water Governance
Previous Article in Special Issue
Numerical Simulations of Suspended Sediment Dynamics Due to Seasonal Forcing in the Mekong Coastal Area
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2017, 9(1), 37; doi:10.3390/w9010037

Statistical Analysis of the Spatial Distribution of Multi-Elements in an Island Arc Region: Complicating Factors and Transfer by Water Currents

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Geological Survey of Japan, Central 7, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sylvain Ouillon
Received: 13 October 2016 / Revised: 23 December 2016 / Accepted: 5 January 2017 / Published: 10 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Transport in Coastal Waters)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4344 KB, uploaded 10 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

The compositions and transfer processes affecting coastal sea sediments from the Seto Inland Sea and the Pacific Ocean are examined through the construction of comprehensive terrestrial and marine geochemical maps for western Japan. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) suggests that the elemental concentrations of marine sediments vary with particle size, and that this has a greater effect than the regional provenance of the terrestrial material. Cluster analysis is employed to reveal similarities and differences in the geochemistry of coastal sea and stream sediments. This analysis suggests that the geochemical features of fine sands and silts in the marine environment reflect those of stream sediments in the adjacent terrestrial areas. However, gravels and coarse sands do not show this direct relationship, which is likely a result of mineral segregation by strong tidal currents and the denudation of old basement rocks. Finally, the transport processes for the fine-grained sediments are discussed, using the spatial distribution patterns of outliers for those elements enriched in silt and clay. Silty and clayey sediments are found to be transported and dispersed widely by a periodic current in the inner sea, and are selectively deposited at the boundary of different water masses in the outer sea. View Full-Text
Keywords: geochemical map; particle transfer process; tidal current; analysis of variance (ANOVA); Cluster analysis; Mahalanobis’ generalized distances; Seto Inland Sea geochemical map; particle transfer process; tidal current; analysis of variance (ANOVA); Cluster analysis; Mahalanobis’ generalized distances; Seto Inland Sea
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ohta, A.; Imai, N.; Tachibana, Y.; Ikehara, K. Statistical Analysis of the Spatial Distribution of Multi-Elements in an Island Arc Region: Complicating Factors and Transfer by Water Currents. Water 2017, 9, 37.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top