Next Article in Journal
Impact of Water Scarcity on the Fenhe River Basin and Mitigation Strategies
Next Article in Special Issue
High Variability Is a Defining Component of Mediterranean-Climate Rivers and Their Biota
Previous Article in Journal
Influence of UV Treatment on the Food Safety Status of a Model Aquaponic System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evolution of Two Urbanized Estuaries: Environmental Change, Legal Framework, and Implications for Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2017, 9(1), 29; doi:10.3390/w9010029

Restoring Summer Base Flow under a Decentralized Water Management Regime: Constraints, Opportunities, and Outcomes in Mediterranean-Climate California

1
Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida, IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, Milton, FL 32583, USA
2
Occidental Arts and Ecology Center WATER Institute, Occidental, CA 95465, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Matt Kondolf
Received: 1 November 2016 / Revised: 14 December 2016 / Accepted: 21 December 2016 / Published: 6 January 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [10282 KB, uploaded 6 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Seasonal rainfall dynamics in Mediterranean-climate coastal California place pressures on humans and aquatic ecosystems. Without rainfall during summer, residents and land managers commonly turn to streams and adjacent shallow aquifers to meet domestic, irrigation, and recreational water needs, often depleting the water necessary to support stream biota. The potential for adverse ecological impacts within this coupled natural-human system has led to interest in restoring summer base flow (especially for federally protected steelhead and coho salmon, which depend on flow through the summer dry season for juvenile survival) through methods such as reducing dry-season water abstractions. Characterizing constraints and opportunities has proven useful for planning streamflow restoration in Mediterranean-climate coastal California. Biophysical parameters such as ample rainfall and very low summer discharge are critical considerations, but institutional parameters are equally important: regional management practices and state laws can inhibit streamflow restoration, and implementation is dependent on interrelationships among residents, agency staff, and other stakeholders (which we term the egosystem) within each watershed. Additionally, while watershed-scale spatial analysis and field-based evaluations provided a solid foundation for exploring streamflow restoration needs, adaptation based on information from local stakeholders was often essential for prioritizing projects and understanding whether projects will have their intended benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mediterranean climate adaptation; coastal California; salmon restoration; water abstraction; hydrologic variability; streamflow seasonality; drought; human–environment interactions Mediterranean climate adaptation; coastal California; salmon restoration; water abstraction; hydrologic variability; streamflow seasonality; drought; human–environment interactions
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Deitch, M.J.; Dolman, B. Restoring Summer Base Flow under a Decentralized Water Management Regime: Constraints, Opportunities, and Outcomes in Mediterranean-Climate California. Water 2017, 9, 29.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top