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Water 2016, 8(9), 369; doi:10.3390/w8090369

Implications of Extracellular Polymeric Substance Matrices of Microbial Habitats Associated with Coastal Aquaculture Systems

1
Laboratorio de Investigación en Recursos Acuáticos LIRA, Instituto Tecnológico de Boca del Río, Kilómetro 12, Carretera Veracruz-Córdoba, Boca del Río 94290, Veracruz, Mexico
2
Laboratorio de Vida Silvestre, Área de Ecología Acuática, CEDESU, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, Colonia Buenavista, San Francisco de Campeche 24039, Campeche, Mexico
3
Centro de Microbiología Ambiental y Biotecnología DEMAB, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche Colonia Buenavista, San Francisco de Campeche 24039, Campeche, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kevin B. Strychar
Received: 11 March 2016 / Revised: 15 August 2016 / Accepted: 19 August 2016 / Published: 27 August 2016
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Abstract

Coastal zones support fisheries that provide food for humans and feed for animals. The decline of fisheries worldwide has fostered the development of aquaculture. Recent research has shown that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) synthesized by microorganisms contribute to sustainable aquaculture production, providing feed to the cultured species, removing waste and contributing to the hygiene of closed systems. As ubiquitous components of coastal microbial habitats at the air–seawater and seawater–sediment interfaces as well as of biofilms and microbial aggregates, EPS mediate deleterious processes that affect the performance and productivity of aquaculture facilities, including biofouling of marine cages, bioaccumulation and transport of pollutants. These biomolecules may also contribute to the persistence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their impact on cultured species. EPS may also exert a positive influence on aquaculture activity by enhancing the settling of aquaculturally valuable larvae and treating wastes in bioflocculation processes. EPS display properties that may have biotechnological applications in the aquaculture industry as antiviral agents and immunostimulants and as a novel source of antifouling bioproducts. View Full-Text
Keywords: extracellular polymeric substances; microbial habitats; coastal aquaculture; marine biotechnology extracellular polymeric substances; microbial habitats; coastal aquaculture; marine biotechnology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Camacho-Chab, J.C.; Lango-Reynoso, F.; Castañeda-Chávez, M.R.; Galaviz-Villa, I.; Hinojosa-Garro, D.; Ortega-Morales, B.O. Implications of Extracellular Polymeric Substance Matrices of Microbial Habitats Associated with Coastal Aquaculture Systems. Water 2016, 8, 369.

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