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Water 2016, 8(6), 242; doi:10.3390/w8060242

Assessment of Risk Due to Chemicals Transferred in a Watershed: A Case of an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery Site

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Dongguk University, 30, Pildong-ro 1-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul 04620, Korea
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Academic Editors: Joan M. Brehm and Brian W. Eisenhauer
Received: 17 March 2016 / Revised: 25 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 4 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Watershed Protection and Management)
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Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the potential risks of chemicals that can affect an aquifer storage transfer and recovery (ASTR) site. ASTR is a water supply system that injects surface water into an aquifer and then extracts naturally filtered groundwater. The pilot site of the ASTR supplying drinking water is located downstream of the Nakdong River in South Korea. Hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) was adopted to ensure suitable water quality in response to the deteriorated water quality of the Nakdong River. HACCP is a proactive management system for ensuring consistent confidence in food (or water). Hazard analysis, the first of the seven principles of HACCP, assesses physical, microbial, chemical, and radioactive hazards. This study focuses on the chemicals that are most likely to be involved in major hazardous events. Pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) data were used to analyze potential risks of chemicals. A PRTR is a national environmental database of potentially hazardous chemicals. Potential risk analysis considers the total amount of chemicals transferred off-site for treatment or disposal. Fifty-five cities and the top 10 chemicals released in the Nakdong River basin were investigated. Potential risk was defined as a function of total transfers, the relative distance, and toxicity. The top 10 cities with high potential risks were identified, and the city with the highest potential risk turned out to be Ulju. View Full-Text
Keywords: drinking water; HACCP; chemical hazard; aquifer storage transfer and recovery; pollutant release and transfer register drinking water; HACCP; chemical hazard; aquifer storage transfer and recovery; pollutant release and transfer register
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Ji, H.W.; Lee, S.-I. Assessment of Risk Due to Chemicals Transferred in a Watershed: A Case of an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery Site. Water 2016, 8, 242.

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