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Water 2016, 8(12), 598; doi:10.3390/w8120598

The Development of Sustainable Saltwater-Based Food Production Systems: A Review of Established and Novel Concepts

1
Daithi O’Murchu Marine Research Station, Bantry, P75 AX07 Co. Cork, Ireland
2
School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork City, T23 TK30 Co. Cork, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: M. Haïssam Jijakli
Received: 16 October 2016 / Revised: 17 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 December 2016 / Published: 16 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquaponics: Toward a Sustainable Water-Based Production System?)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [379 KB, uploaded 16 December 2016]

Abstract

The demand for seafood products on the global market is rising, particularly in Asia, as affluence and appreciation of the health benefits of seafood increase. This is coupled with a capture fishery that, at best, is set for stagnation and, at worst, significant collapse. Global aquaculture is the fastest growing sector of the food industry and currently accounts for approximately 45.6% of the world’s fish consumption. However, the rapid development of extensive and semi-extensive systems, particularly intensive marine-fed aquaculture, has resulted in worldwide concern about the potential environmental, economic, and social impacts of such systems. In recent years, there has been a significant amount of research conducted on the development of sustainable saltwater-based food production systems through mechanical (e.g., recirculatory aquaculture (RAS) systems) methods and ecosystem-based approaches (e.g., integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA)). This review article will examine the potential negative impacts of monocultural saltwater aquaculture operations and review established (RAS) and novel (IMTA; constructed wetlands; saltwater aquaponics) saltwater-based food production systems and discuss their (potential) contribution to the development of sustainable and environmentally-friendly systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: aquaculture; constructed wetlands (CWs); recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS); integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA); hydroponics; saltwater aquaponics aquaculture; constructed wetlands (CWs); recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS); integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA); hydroponics; saltwater aquaponics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Gunning, D.; Maguire, J.; Burnell, G. The Development of Sustainable Saltwater-Based Food Production Systems: A Review of Established and Novel Concepts. Water 2016, 8, 598.

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