Next Article in Journal
Novel EDA or EDAR Mutations Identified in Patients with X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia or Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis
Next Article in Special Issue
Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera
Previous Article in Journal
Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer and the Potential Development of Therapeutic Tools
Previous Article in Special Issue
Satellite DNA: An Evolving Topic
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Genes 2017, 8(10), 258; doi:10.3390/genes8100258

Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

1
Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP CEP 13565-905, Brazil
2
Laboratory of Fish Genetics, Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Rumburská 89, Liběchov 277 21, Czech Republic
These authors have contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Thomas Liehr
Received: 25 August 2017 / Revised: 27 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 5 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromosomal Evolution)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3434 KB, uploaded 9 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Abstract: Fishes exhibit the greatest diversity of species among vertebrates, offering a number of relevant models for genetic and evolutionary studies. The investigation of sex chromosome differentiation is a very active and striking research area of fish cytogenetics, as fishes represent one of the most vital model groups. Neotropical fish species show an amazing variety of sex chromosome systems, where different stages of differentiation can be found, ranging from homomorphic to highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Here, we draw attention on the impact of recent developments in molecular cytogenetic analyses that helped to elucidate many unknown questions about fish sex chromosome evolution, using excellent characiform models occurring in the Neotropical region, namely the Erythrinidae family and the Triportheus genus. While in Erythrinidae distinct XY and/or multiple XY-derived sex chromosome systems have independently evolved at least four different times, representatives of Triportheus show an opposite scenario, i.e., highly conserved ZZ/ZW system with a monophyletic origin. In both cases, recent molecular approaches, such as mapping of repetitive DNA classes, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and whole chromosome painting (WCP), allowed us to unmask several new features linked to the molecular composition and differentiation processes of sex chromosomes in fishes. View Full-Text
Keywords: alternative evolutionary models; simple and multiple sex chromosomes; independent and common origins; conventional and molecular cytogenetics alternative evolutionary models; simple and multiple sex chromosomes; independent and common origins; conventional and molecular cytogenetics
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Cioffi, M.B.; Yano, C.F.; Sember, A.; Bertollo, L.A.C. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes. Genes 2017, 8, 258.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Genes EISSN 2073-4425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top