Genes 2012, 3(4), 634-650; doi:10.3390/genes3040634
Article

Factors Behind Junk DNA in Bacteria

Received: 25 July 2012; in revised form: 11 September 2012 / Accepted: 25 September 2012 / Published: 12 October 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Junk DNA' is not Junk)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Although bacterial genomes have been traditionally viewed as being very compact, with relatively low amounts of repetitive and non-coding DNA, this view has dramatically changed in recent years. The increase of available complete bacterial genomes has revealed that many species present abundant repetitive DNA (i.e., insertion sequences, prophages or paralogous genes) and that many of these sequences are not functional but can have evolutionary consequences as concerns the adaptation to specialized host-related ecological niches. Comparative genomics analyses with close relatives that live in non-specialized environments reveal the nature and fate of this bacterial junk DNA. In addition, the number of insertion sequences and pseudogenes, as well as the size of the intergenic regions, can be used as markers of the evolutionary stage of a genome.
Keywords: junk DNA; pseudogenes; intergenic regions (IGR); insertion sequences (IS); genome degradation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gil, R.; Latorre, A. Factors Behind Junk DNA in Bacteria. Genes 2012, 3, 634-650.

AMA Style

Gil R, Latorre A. Factors Behind Junk DNA in Bacteria. Genes. 2012; 3(4):634-650.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo. 2012. "Factors Behind Junk DNA in Bacteria." Genes 3, no. 4: 634-650.

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