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Polymers 2014, 6(2), 479-490; doi:10.3390/polym6020479

Antimicrobial Plant Extracts Encapsulated into Polymeric Beads for Potential Application on the Skin

1
CBiOS—Center for Research in Biosciences & Health Technologies, Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Campo Grande 376, Lisboa 1749-024, Portugal
2
Research Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, Lisboa 1649-003, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 December 2013 / Revised: 4 February 2014 / Accepted: 10 February 2014 / Published: 18 February 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Drug Delivery)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [297 KB, uploaded 18 February 2014]   |  

Abstract

In this study, the in vitro bacterial growth inhibition, antioxidant activity and the content in bioactive components of Plectranthus barbatus, P. hadiensis var. tomentosus, P. madagascarensis, P. neochilus and P. verticillatus aqueous extracts were investigated and compared by three extraction methods (infusion, decoction and microwave extractions). The microwave extract of P. madagascariensis showed the higher antimicrobial activity against the Staphylococcus epidermidis strain with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 40 µg/mL. This extract also showed no toxicity in a general toxicity assay and no considerable cytotoxicity against a human keratinocyte cell line. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was assessed using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH method), and all showed antioxidant activity. The microwave extract of P. madagascariensis was the one with the highest antioxidant activity (IC50 value of 41.66 µg/mL). To increase extract stability, the microwave P. madagascariensis extract was then successfully encapsulated into alginate beads with high efficiency. This effective and low-cost strategy seems to be easy to extrapolate to an industrial scale with a future application on the skin. View Full-Text
Keywords: Plectranthus; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; polymeric beads; alginate; extraction methods Plectranthus; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; polymeric beads; alginate; extraction methods
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rijo, P.; Matias, D.; Fernandes, A.S.; Simões, M.F.; Nicolai, M.; Reis, C.P. Antimicrobial Plant Extracts Encapsulated into Polymeric Beads for Potential Application on the Skin. Polymers 2014, 6, 479-490.

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