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Micromachines 2014, 5(2), 289-299; doi:10.3390/mi5020289
Article

A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators

Quantitative Biology Center (QBiC), RIKEN, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan
Received: 14 March 2014 / Revised: 2 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 23 May 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micropumps: Design, Fabrication and Applications)
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Abstract

Lab-on-a-chip technology is promising for the miniaturization of chemistry, biochemistry, and/or biology researchers looking to exploit the advantages of a microspace. To manipulate fluid on a microchip, on-chip pumps are indispensable. To date, there have been several types of on-chip pumps including pneumatic, electroactive, and magnetically driven. However these pumps introduce polymers, metals, and/or silicon to the microchip, and these materials have several disadvantages, including chemical or physical instability, or an inherent optical detection limit. To overcome/avoid these issues, glass has been one of the most commonly utilized materials for the production of multi-purpose integrated chemical systems. However, glass is very rigid, and it is difficult to incorporate pumps onto glass microchips. This paper reports the use of a very flexible, ultra-thin glass sheet (minimum thickness of a few micrometers) to realize a pump installed on an entirely glass-based microchip. The pump is a peristaltic-type, composed of four serial valves sealing a cavity with two penetrate holes using ultra-thin glass sheet. By this pump, an on-chip circulating flow was demonstrated by directly observing fluid flow, visualized via polystyrene tracking particles. The flow rate was proportional to the pumping frequency, with a maximum flow rate of approximately 0.80 μL/min. This on-chip pump could likely be utilized in a wide range of applications which require the stability of a glass microchip.
Keywords: lab-on-a-chip; peristaltic pump; on-chip valve and pump; glass microchip; ultra thin glass lab-on-a-chip; peristaltic pump; on-chip valve and pump; glass microchip; ultra thin glass
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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Tanaka, Y. A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators. Micromachines 2014, 5, 289-299.

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