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Micromachines 2014, 5(2), 289-299; doi:10.3390/mi5020289
Article

A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators

Received: 14 March 2014; in revised form: 2 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 23 May 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micropumps: Design, Fabrication and Applications)
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Abstract: Lab-on-a-chip technology is promising for the miniaturization of chemistry, biochemistry, and/or biology researchers looking to exploit the advantages of a microspace. To manipulate fluid on a microchip, on-chip pumps are indispensable. To date, there have been several types of on-chip pumps including pneumatic, electroactive, and magnetically driven. However these pumps introduce polymers, metals, and/or silicon to the microchip, and these materials have several disadvantages, including chemical or physical instability, or an inherent optical detection limit. To overcome/avoid these issues, glass has been one of the most commonly utilized materials for the production of multi-purpose integrated chemical systems. However, glass is very rigid, and it is difficult to incorporate pumps onto glass microchips. This paper reports the use of a very flexible, ultra-thin glass sheet (minimum thickness of a few micrometers) to realize a pump installed on an entirely glass-based microchip. The pump is a peristaltic-type, composed of four serial valves sealing a cavity with two penetrate holes using ultra-thin glass sheet. By this pump, an on-chip circulating flow was demonstrated by directly observing fluid flow, visualized via polystyrene tracking particles. The flow rate was proportional to the pumping frequency, with a maximum flow rate of approximately 0.80 μL/min. This on-chip pump could likely be utilized in a wide range of applications which require the stability of a glass microchip.
Keywords: lab-on-a-chip; peristaltic pump; on-chip valve and pump; glass microchip; ultra thin glass lab-on-a-chip; peristaltic pump; on-chip valve and pump; glass microchip; ultra thin glass
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tanaka, Y. A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators. Micromachines 2014, 5, 289-299.

AMA Style

Tanaka Y. A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators. Micromachines. 2014; 5(2):289-299.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tanaka, Yo. 2014. "A Peristaltic Pump Integrated on a 100% Glass Microchip Using Computer Controlled Piezoelectric Actuators." Micromachines 5, no. 2: 289-299.


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