Next Article in Journal
Is qPCR a Reliable Indicator of Cyanotoxin Risk in Freshwater?
Next Article in Special Issue
Use of VacA as a Vaccine Antigen
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Zinc Chelators on Aflatoxin Production in Aspergillus parasiticus
Previous Article in Special Issue
New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Toxins 2016, 8(6), 173; doi:10.3390/toxins8060173

An Overview of Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Biology

1
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
2
Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
3
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
4
Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
5
Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37212, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jean E. Crabtree
Received: 16 April 2016 / Revised: 18 May 2016 / Accepted: 27 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vacuolating Toxin)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2673 KB, uploaded 3 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

The VacA toxin secreted by Helicobacter pylori enhances the ability of the bacteria to colonize the stomach and contributes to the pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma and peptic ulcer disease. The amino acid sequence and structure of VacA are unrelated to corresponding features of other known bacterial toxins. VacA is classified as a pore-forming toxin, and many of its effects on host cells are attributed to formation of channels in intracellular sites. The most extensively studied VacA activity is its capacity to stimulate vacuole formation, but the toxin has many additional effects on host cells. Multiple cell types are susceptible to VacA, including gastric epithelial cells, parietal cells, T cells, and other types of immune cells. This review focuses on the wide range of VacA actions that are detectable in vitro, as well as actions of VacA in vivo that are relevant for H. pylori colonization of the stomach and development of gastric disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial toxins; vacuolating toxin; autotransporter; type V secretion; gastric cancer bacterial toxins; vacuolating toxin; autotransporter; type V secretion; gastric cancer
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Foegeding, N.J.; Caston, R.R.; McClain, M.S.; Ohi, M.D.; Cover, T.L. An Overview of Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Biology. Toxins 2016, 8, 173.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Toxins EISSN 2072-6651 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top