Next Article in Journal
Maternal Consumption of Hesperidin and Naringin  Flavanones Exerts Transient Effects to Tibia Bone  Structure in Female CD‐1 Offspring
Next Article in Special Issue
CYP1A2 Genotype Variations Do Not Modify the Benefits and Drawbacks of Caffeine during Exercise: A Pilot Study
Previous Article in Journal
Inhibition of VEGF-Induced VEGFR-2 Activation and HUVEC Migration by Melatonin and Other Bioactive Indolic Compounds
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evaluating Changes in Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake after Receiving Personal FADS1 Genetic Information: A Randomized Nutrigenetic Intervention
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Nutrients 2017, 9(3), 246; doi:10.3390/nu9030246

Genetic Variations Associated with Vitamin A Status and Vitamin A Bioavailability

NORT, Aix-Marseille Université, INRA, INSERM, 13005 Marseille, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 January 2017 / Revised: 27 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 8 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenetics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1312 KB, uploaded 8 March 2017]   |  

Abstract

Blood concentration of vitamin A (VA), which is present as different molecules, i.e., mainly retinol and provitamin A carotenoids, plus retinyl esters in the postprandial period after a VA-containing meal, is affected by numerous factors: dietary VA intake, VA absorption efficiency, efficiency of provitamin A carotenoid conversion to VA, VA tissue uptake, etc. Most of these factors are in turn modulated by genetic variations in genes encoding proteins involved in VA metabolism. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with blood concentrations of retinol and β-carotene, as well as with β-carotene bioavailability. These genetic variations likely explain, at least in part, interindividual variability in VA status and in VA bioavailability. However, much work remains to be done to identify all of the SNPs involved in VA status and bioavailability and to assess the possible involvement of other kinds of genetic variations, e.g., copy number variants and insertions/deletions, in these phenotypes. Yet, the potential usefulness of this area of research is exciting regarding the proposition of more personalized dietary recommendations in VA, particularly in populations at risk of VA deficiency. View Full-Text
Keywords: genetic polymorphisms; absorption; bioavailability; β-carotene; retinyl palmitate; retinol; nutrigenetics; blood concentration; provitamin A; carotenoids; β-cryptoxanthin; α-carotene; postprandial genetic polymorphisms; absorption; bioavailability; β-carotene; retinyl palmitate; retinol; nutrigenetics; blood concentration; provitamin A; carotenoids; β-cryptoxanthin; α-carotene; postprandial
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Borel, P.; Desmarchelier, C. Genetic Variations Associated with Vitamin A Status and Vitamin A Bioavailability. Nutrients 2017, 9, 246.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top