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Nutrients 2017, 9(10), 1149; doi:10.3390/nu9101149

Body Weight Cycling with Identical Diet Composition Does Not Affect Energy Balance and Has No Adverse Effect on Metabolic Health Parameters

Human and Animal Physiology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Received: 20 August 2017 / Revised: 15 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Approaches to Prevent Weight Regain)
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Abstract

Background: Body weight (BW) cycling, the yo-yo effect, is generally thought to have adverse effects on human metabolic health. However, human and animal experiments are limited in number and do not provide clear answers, partly due to large variations in experimental design, parameters measured, and definitions of BW cycling. Here, we examined the effect of repetitive BW cycling versus single- and non-cycling control groups, without alterations in diet composition, on steady state BW and metabolic parameters. Methods: We induced well-defined BW cycles on a semi-purified high fat diet in C57BL/6J mice, a well-described animal model for diet-induced obesity, and measured energy expenditure and relevant metabolic parameters. Results: Our setup indeed resulted in the intended BW changes and always reached a stage of energy balance. A history of weight cycling did not result in increased BW or fat mass compared with the control group, nor in deteriorated serum concentrations of glucose, adipokines and serum triglyceride and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. If anything, BW tended to be reduced, presumably because of a reduced overall energy intake in BW cycling animals. Conclusion: Repeated cycling in BW without changes in diet composition does not lead to impaired metabolic health nor increased BW (gain). View Full-Text
Keywords: body weight cycling; nutritional physiology; basal metabolism; C57BL6; serum marker; adipose tissue; yo-yo body weight cycling; nutritional physiology; basal metabolism; C57BL6; serum marker; adipose tissue; yo-yo
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MDPI and ACS Style

Palm, I.F.; Schram, R.G.A.E.; Swarts, H.J.M.; van Schothorst, E.M.; Keijer, J. Body Weight Cycling with Identical Diet Composition Does Not Affect Energy Balance and Has No Adverse Effect on Metabolic Health Parameters. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1149.

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