Next Article in Journal
Translational Aspects of Diet and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of Dietary Intake in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Nutrients 2017, 9(10), 1075; doi:10.3390/nu9101075

Sugar- and Intense-Sweetened Drinks in Australia: A Systematic Review on Cardiometabolic Risk

1
Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne 3000, Australia
2
Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Australia
3
School of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Australia
4
Centre for Urban Transitions, Swinburne University, Hawthorn 3122, Australia
5
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne 3004, Australia
6
Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
7
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown 2006, Australia
Co first authors.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 August 2017 / Revised: 11 September 2017 / Accepted: 25 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [421 KB, uploaded 28 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are consumed globally, and have been associated with adverse health outcomes, including weight gain, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is global variation in beverage formulation in terms of glucose and fructose concentration, which may pose unique health risks linked to glycemic control for Australian consumers. However, previous systematic reviews have overlooked Australian-based literature. A systematic review was performed to synthesise evidence for the associations between consumption of SSBs and intense-sweetened beverages with clinical cardiometabolic risk factors in the Australian population. Articles were sourced from Global Health, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, Medline, and Culmative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. To be eligible for review, studies had to report on the consumption of sugar-sweetened (including fruit juice and fruit drinks) and/or intense-sweetened beverages, and at least one clinical cardiometabolic risk factor. Eighteen studies were included in this review. Research has mostly focused on the relationship between SSB consumption and adiposity-related outcomes. No studies have examined indices of glycaemic control (glucose/insulin), and the evidence for the health impact of intense-sweetened drinks is limited. In addition, studies have primarily been of cross-sectional design, and have examined children and adolescents, as opposed to adult populations. In the Australian population, there is modest but consistent evidence that SSB consumption has adverse associations with weight, but there is insufficient data to assess relationships with cardiometabolic outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; intense-sweetened beverages; glycaemic control; cardiometabolic risk factors; systematic review sugar-sweetened beverages; intense-sweetened beverages; glycaemic control; cardiometabolic risk factors; systematic review
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hoare, E.; Varsamis, P.; Owen, N.; Dunstan, D.W.; Jennings, G.L.; Kingwell, B.A. Sugar- and Intense-Sweetened Drinks in Australia: A Systematic Review on Cardiometabolic Risk. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1075.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top