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Nutrients 2016, 8(4), 239; doi:10.3390/nu8040239

Association between Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China
2
Department of Digestion, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 March 2016 / Revised: 17 April 2016 / Accepted: 17 April 2016 / Published: 23 April 2016
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Abstract

Epidemiological studies of different dietary patterns and the risk of hypertension among a middle-aged Chinese population remain extremely scare. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify dietary patterns and investigate the relationship between dietary patterns and the risk of hypertension among Chinese adults aged 45–60 years. The present cross-sectional study includes 2560 participants who reported their dietary intake using a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Anthropometric measurements were obtained using standardized procedures. We used log-binomial regression analysis to examine the associations between dietary patterns and hypertension risk. Four major dietary patterns were identified and labeled as traditional Chinese, animal food, western fast-food, and high-salt patterns. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest quartile of animal food pattern scores had a greater prevalence ratio (PR) for hypertension (PR = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.064–1.727; p < 0.05) in comparison to those from the lowest quartile. Compared with the lowest quartile of high-salt pattern, the highest quartile had a higher prevalence ratio for hypertension (PR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.013–1.635; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings indicated that animal food and high-salt patterns were associated with increased risk of hypertension, while traditional Chinese and western fast-food patterns were not associated with the risk of hypertension. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary patterns; hypertension; middle-aged population; factor analysis dietary patterns; hypertension; middle-aged population; factor analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Zheng, P.-F.; Shu, L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Si, C.-J.; Yu, X.-L.; Gao, W.; Tong, X.-Q.; Zhang, L. Association between Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2016, 8, 239.

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