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Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3187-3201; doi:10.3390/nu6083187

Dietary Fructose Reduction Improves Markers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Hispanic-American Adolescents with NAFLD

1
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, 2015 Uppergate Drive NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
3
Biomarker Core Laboratory, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA 30033, USA
4
Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
Present address: University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721, USA.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 June 2014 / Revised: 13 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Liver Disease)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [250 KB, uploaded 8 August 2014]   |  

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now thought to be the most common liver disease worldwide. Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD. Fructose, a common nutrient in the westernized diet, has been reported to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but its impact on adolescents with NAFLD is not well understood. We designed a 4-week randomized, controlled, double-blinded beverage intervention study. Twenty-four overweight Hispanic-American adolescents who had hepatic fat >8% on imaging and who were regular consumers of sweet beverages were enrolled and randomized to calorie-matched study-provided fructose only or glucose only beverages. After 4 weeks, there was no significant change in hepatic fat or body weight in either group. In the glucose beverage group there was significantly improved adipose insulin sensitivity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. These findings demonstrate that reduction of fructose improves several important factors related to cardiovascular disease despite a lack of measurable improvement in hepatic steatosis. Reducing dietary fructose may be an effective intervention to blunt atherosclerosis progression among NAFLD patients and should be evaluated in longer term clinical trials. View Full-Text
Keywords: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; hepatic steatosis; fructose; sugar; cardiovascular risk; obesity; children and adolescents nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; hepatic steatosis; fructose; sugar; cardiovascular risk; obesity; children and adolescents
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jin, R.; Welsh, J.A.; Le, N.-A.; Holzberg, J.; Sharma, P.; Martin, D.R.; Vos, M.B. Dietary Fructose Reduction Improves Markers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Hispanic-American Adolescents with NAFLD. Nutrients 2014, 6, 3187-3201.

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