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Nutrients 2010, 2(9), 950-964; doi:10.3390/nu2090950
Article

Calcium Intake and Body Composition in African-American Children and Adolescents at Risk for Overweight and Obesity

1,* , 2
,
3
,
4
 and
5
1 Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 600 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 300, Memphis, TN 38112, USA 2 College of Nursing, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, Suite 507N, Memphis, TN 38103, USA 3 Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 600 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 300, Memphis, TN 38112, USA 4 General Clinical Research Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 8 East Methodist University Hospital, Memphis, TN 38104, USA 5 Lifestyle Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 1068 Cresthaven, Suite 300, Memphis, TN 38119, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 July 2010 / Revised: 27 August 2010 / Accepted: 9 September 2010 / Published: 10 September 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Calcium)
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Abstract

This study examined the role of calcium intake on body composition in 186 African-American adolescents at risk for overweight and obesity. The average weight of 89.8 kg ± 23.6 (SD) had a mean BMI z score of 2.2. Females with a calcium intake of < 314 mg/day had higher percent fat mass compared to those with the highest calcium intakes that were ≥ 634 mg/day. Compared to those with a low calcium intake (< 365 mg/day), those with the highest calcium intake of > 701 mg/day had higher intake of thiamin, folate, cobalamin, vitamin D, phosphorus, iron, zinc.
Keywords: dietary calcium; overweight; adolescents; hypertension; dyslipidemia; glucose metabolism dietary calcium; overweight; adolescents; hypertension; dyslipidemia; glucose metabolism
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).
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Tylavsky, F.A.; Cowan, P.A.; Terrell, S.; Hutson, M.; Velasquez-Mieyer, P. Calcium Intake and Body Composition in African-American Children and Adolescents at Risk for Overweight and Obesity. Nutrients 2010, 2, 950-964.

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