Nutrients 2010, 2(4), 474-480; doi:10.3390/nu2040474
Review

Calcium Absorption in Infants and Small Children: Methods of Determination and Recent Findings

Received: 4 February 2010; in revised form: 22 March 2010 / Accepted: 2 April 2010 / Published: 6 April 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Calcium)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Determining calcium bioavailability is important in establishing dietary calcium requirements. In infants and small children, previously conducted mass balance studies have largely been replaced by stable isotope-based studies. The ability to assess calcium absorption using a relatively short 24-hour urine collection without the need for multiple blood samples or fecal collections is a major advantage to this technique. The results of these studies have demonstrated relatively small differences in calcium absorption efficiency between human milk and currently available cow milk-based infant formulas. In older children with a calcium intake typical of Western diets, calcium absorption is adequate to meet bone mineral accretion requirements.
Keywords: calcium absorption; infant nutrition; bone mineral content
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abrams, S.A. Calcium Absorption in Infants and Small Children: Methods of Determination and Recent Findings. Nutrients 2010, 2, 474-480.

AMA Style

Abrams SA. Calcium Absorption in Infants and Small Children: Methods of Determination and Recent Findings. Nutrients. 2010; 2(4):474-480.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abrams, Steven A. 2010. "Calcium Absorption in Infants and Small Children: Methods of Determination and Recent Findings." Nutrients 2, no. 4: 474-480.

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