Next Article in Journal
Comparison between Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry and Bioelectrical Impedance Analyses for Accuracy in Measuring Whole Body Muscle Mass and Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass
Previous Article in Journal
Iodine Status Assessment in South African Adults According to Spot Urinary Iodine Concentrations, Prediction Equations, and Measured 24-h Iodine Excretion
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 737; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060737

Comparative Analysis of the Classification of Food Products in the Mexican Market According to Seven Different Nutrient Profiling Systems

1
Center for Research on Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca 62100, Mexico;. alejandra.contreras@insp.mx (A.C.-M.)
2
National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca 62100, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 7 June 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [673 KB, uploaded 7 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

Nutrient profiling systems (NPS) are used around the world. In some countries, the food industry participates in the design of these systems. We aimed to compare the ability of various NPS to identify processed and ultra-processed Mexican products containing excessive amounts of critical nutrients. A sample of 2544 foods and beverages available in the Mexican market were classified as compliant and non-compliant according to seven NPS: the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) model, which served as our reference, the Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC), the Mexican Committee of Nutrition Experts (MCNE), the Health Star Rating (HSR), the Mexican Nutritional Seal (MNS), the Chilean Warning Octagons (CWO) 2016, 2018 and 2019 criteria, and Ecuador’s Multiple Traffic Light (MTL). Overall, the proportion of foods classified as compliant by the HSR, MTL and MCNE models was similar to the PAHO model. In contrast, the NPSC, the MNS and the CWO-2016 classified a higher amount of foods as compliant. Larger differences between NPS classification were observed across food categories. Results support the notion that models developed with the involvement of food manufacturers are more permissive than those based on scientific evidence. Results highlight the importance of thoroughly evaluating the underlying criteria of a model. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrient profiling system; NPSC; Health Star Rating; PAHO model; multiple traffic light; Mexican Nutrition Seal; Chilean Warning Octagons; critical nutrients; ultra-processed products nutrient profiling system; NPSC; Health Star Rating; PAHO model; multiple traffic light; Mexican Nutrition Seal; Chilean Warning Octagons; critical nutrients; ultra-processed products
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Contreras-Manzano, A.; Jáuregui, A.; Velasco-Bernal, A.; Vargas-Meza, J.; Rivera, J.A.; Tolentino-Mayo, L.; Barquera, S. Comparative Analysis of the Classification of Food Products in the Mexican Market According to Seven Different Nutrient Profiling Systems. Nutrients 2018, 10, 737.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top