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Sustainability 2015, 7(11), 14710-14728; doi:10.3390/su71114710

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emission Assessment of Conventional and Solar Assisted Air Conditioning Systems

Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Lin Lu and Marc A. Rosen
Received: 15 August 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 27 October 2015 / Published: 3 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy Applications and Energy Saving in Buildings)
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Abstract

Energy consumption in the buildings is responsible for 26% of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions where cooling typically accounts for over 50% of the total building energy use. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for reducing the cooling systems’ environmental footprint with applications of alternative renewable energy source. Three types of cooling systems, water cooled, air cooled and a hybrid solar-based air-conditioning system, with a total of six scenarios were designed in this work. The scenarios accounted for the types of power supply to the air-conditioning systems with electricity from the grid and with a solar power from highly integrated building photovoltaics (BIPV). Within and between these scenarios, systems’ energy performances were compared based on energy modelling while the harvesting potential of the renewable energy source was further predicted based on building’s detailed geometrical model. The results showed that renewable energy obtained via BIPV scenario could cover building’s annual electricity consumption for cooling and reduce 140 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions each year. The hybrid solar air-conditioning system has higher energy efficiency than the air cooled chiller system but lower than the water cooled system. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability; solar-assisted air-conditioner; building integrated photovoltaic; energy consumption; energyplus simulation; greenhouse gas emission; educationasustainability; solar-assisted air-conditioner; building integrated photovoltaic; energy consumption; energyplus simulation; greenhouse gas emission; educational buildingl building sustainability; solar-assisted air-conditioner; building integrated photovoltaic; energy consumption; energyplus simulation; greenhouse gas emission; educationasustainability; solar-assisted air-conditioner; building integrated photovoltaic; energy consumption; energyplus simulation; greenhouse gas emission; educational buildingl building
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, X.; Strezov, V. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emission Assessment of Conventional and Solar Assisted Air Conditioning Systems. Sustainability 2015, 7, 14710-14728.

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