Next Article in Journal
Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR)
Next Article in Special Issue
A Method for Gauging Landscape Change as a Prelude to Urban Watershed Regeneration: The Case of the Carioca River, Rio de Janeiro
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Ganges and the GAP: An Assessment of Efforts to Clean a Sacred River
A correction was published on 13 September 2012, see Sustainability 2012, 4(9), 2209.

Sustainability 2012, 4(8), 1669-1682; doi:10.3390/su4081669
Article

Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Stormwater Management

* ,
,
,
 and
Received: 26 June 2012; in revised form: 20 July 2012 / Accepted: 26 July 2012 / Published: 6 August 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Regeneration and Sustainability)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1506 KB, uploaded 6 August 2012]   |   Browse Figures
Abstract: Decentralized stormwater management is based on the dispersal of stormwater management practices (SWMP) throughout a watershed to manage stormwater runoff volume and potentially restore natural hydrologic processes. This approach to stormwater management is increasingly popular but faces constraints related to land access and citizen engagement. We tested a novel method of environmental management through citizen-based stormwater management on suburban private land. After a nominal induction of human capital through an education campaign, two successive (2007, 2008) reverse auctions engaged residents to voluntarily bid on installation of SWMPs on their property. Cumulatively, 81 rain gardens and 165 rain barrels were installed on approximately one-third of the 350 eligible residential properties in the watershed, resulting in an estimated 360 m3 increase in stormwater detention capacity. One surprising result was the abundance of zero dollar bids, indicating even a limited-effort human capital campaign was sufficient to enroll many participants. In addition, we used statistical methods to illustrate the significant role of social capital in forming clusters of adjacent properties that participated in bidding. This indicated that as participants shared their experiences, neighbors may have become more willing to trust the program and enroll. Significant agglomerations of participating properties may indicate a shift in neighborhood culture regarding stormwater management with positive implications for watershed health through the sustained induction of alternate capitals.
Keywords: urban stormwater management; green infrastructure; resilience; human capital; social capital; cultural capital; best management practices; private property; combined sewer overflow; economic incentive urban stormwater management; green infrastructure; resilience; human capital; social capital; cultural capital; best management practices; private property; combined sewer overflow; economic incentive
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Green, O.O.; Shuster, W.D.; Rhea, L.K.; Garmestani, A.S.; Thurston, H.W. Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Stormwater Management. Sustainability 2012, 4, 1669-1682.

AMA Style

Green OO, Shuster WD, Rhea LK, Garmestani AS, Thurston HW. Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Stormwater Management. Sustainability. 2012; 4(8):1669-1682.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Green, Olivia Odom; Shuster, William D.; Rhea, Lee K.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Thurston, Hale W. 2012. "Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Stormwater Management." Sustainability 4, no. 8: 1669-1682.


Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert