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Future Internet 2014, 6(4), 760-772; doi:10.3390/fi6040760

Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users

1
School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland
2
Dundee Business School, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland
This article was originally presented at the Cyberforensics 2014 conference. Reference: Shepherd, L.A.; Archibald, J.; Ferguson, R.I. Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users. In Proceedings of Cyberforensics 2014, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK, 2014; pp. 7–14.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 July 2014 / Revised: 22 October 2014 / Accepted: 6 November 2014 / Published: 27 November 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Cybercrime and Cybercrime Mitigation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [292 KB, uploaded 27 November 2014]   |  

Abstract

Despite the number of tools created to help end-users reduce risky security behaviours, users are still falling victim to online attacks. This paper proposes a browser extension utilising affective feedback to provide warnings on detection of risky behaviour. The paper provides an overview of behaviour considered to be risky, explaining potential threats users may face online. Existing tools developed to reduce risky security behaviours in end-users have been compared, discussing the success rates of various methodologies. Ongoing research is described which attempts to educate users regarding the risks and consequences of poor security behaviour by providing the appropriate feedback on the automatic recognition of risky behaviour. The paper concludes that a solution utilising a browser extension is a suitable method of monitoring potentially risky security behaviour. Ultimately, future work seeks to implement an affective feedback mechanism within the browser extension with the aim of improving security awareness. View Full-Text
Keywords: usable security; end-user security behaviours; affective computing; user monitoring techniques; affective feedback; security awareness usable security; end-user security behaviours; affective computing; user monitoring techniques; affective feedback; security awareness
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Shepherd, L.A.; Archibald, J.; Ferguson, R.I. Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users. Future Internet 2014, 6, 760-772.

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